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The Playlist

Review & Recap: ‘Game Of Thrones’ Season 3 Begins To Coalesce With Episode 2 'Dark Wings, Dark Words'

  • By Katie Walsh
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  • April 7, 2013 7:05 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Joe Dempsie, Ben Hawkey and Maisie Williams in Game of Thrones
After episode one, "Valar Dohaeris," reminded us of what half of our Seven Kingdoms are up to in “Game Of Thrones,” episode two, “Dark Wings, Dark Words,” catches us up with the remaining characters not featured in the inaugural episode and moves the story forward in a more decided fashion, introducing new, significant characters and teaching us a bit more about some of the more mysterious aspects of story.

Review: It Might Not Be Journalism, But You Won't Find The Stories On 'Vice' Anywhere Else

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 5, 2013 5:18 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Ah, Vice. The once long ago irreverent little zine out of Montreal and has grown into a globe spanning empire, with offices around the world, and an online presence that has expanded far beyond their still free, glossy monthly magazine. And while they may still be snarked at for their ongoing Dos & Don'ts, stunt like "reporting" which sometimes is as sophisticated as someone taking drugs and then writing about it (an approach spoofed by Lena Dunham on "Girls") and general tendency to stick to the kind of off-the-cuff, fratboy humor that made their name, if you look closer, they've matured considerably.

Review & Recap: ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 3 Slowly Rises From The Ashes of ‘Battle Of Blackwater’ In Episode 1, 'Valar Dohaeris'

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • March 31, 2013 8:58 PM
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  • 8 Comments
Sometimes you have to be a little nerdy to fully understand HBO’s “Game of Thrones.” Or at least understand it more deeply than the average viewer. If Season 2 ended with the well-titled episode “Valar Morghulis" meaning, “all men must die,” in Season 3 we begin with the less ominous and more appropriate "Valar Dohaeris" -- “all men must serve.” As fans of Westeros should know, Season 3 falls roughly within the first half of “A Storm of Swords,” the third of the “A Song of Ice and Fire” novels by George R. R. Martin.

Review: 'Phil Spector' Killed Lana Clarkson, But David Mamet's Movie Presupposes, Maybe He Didn't?

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 22, 2013 8:56 AM
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  • 4 Comments
With production on the film starting all the way back in the summer of 2011, it's been a curiously long wait for David Mamet's "Phil Spector," and from the first moment, one gets the impression that HBO's lawyers were a bit nervous about the effort. Before we even see one frame of the picture, an opening title card insists: "This is a work of fiction. It's not 'based on a true story.' It is a drama inspired by actual persons in a trial, but it is neither an attempt to depict the actual persons, nor to comment upon the trial or its outcome." But frankly, it's a little hard to swallow, particular since the director himself has been quite clear about what he thinks about Spector's fate regarding the murder of Lana Clarkson.

Recap: After An Adventurous Season 2, 'Girls' Finale Plays It Safe & Conventional

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 18, 2013 9:56 AM
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  • 3 Comments
It has been a pretty adventurous second season for "Girls," and one has to look no further than the experimental, format-breaking mid-season episodes. The nearly standalone short film "One Man's Trash," the Staten Island-set "Boys" and Jessa one-off "Video Games" were all fascinating detours from the show's more traditional HBO comedy format, and often delivered bigger dramatic and emotional payoffs. But as the series wound down, the return to a more conventional approach has been less satisfying, and this weekend's finale is certainly a let down for anyone hoping that Lena Dunham might regularly be taking "Girls" into bolder waters structurally.

DVD Review: Missing ‘House Of Cards’? Excellent ‘Borgen’ Season 1 Will Keep You Satisfied

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 12, 2013 9:58 AM
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  • 4 Comments
If it isn’t already happening, Danish television is about to have a moment. AMC’s remake of the “The Killing” was canceled, swiftly brought back, and is now shooting its third season. HBO is in the midst of remaking the popular series “The Bridge” and NBC already snagged the rights to the political drama “Borgen.” It’s arguably the hottest of the three shows at the moment -- Stephen King named it as the best television he watched 2012 (the aforementioned Danish shows above made the top ten as well) -- and coming in the wake of Netflix’s tremendously well received “House Of Cards,” those looking to slake their thirst on political drama would be highly recommended to track down “Borgen,” which is arguably even more dense and layered than David Fincher and Kevin Spacey’s program.

Recap: Charlie & Marnie Spin Their Wheels As The Jim & Pam Of 'Girls' In Subpar Outing

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 11, 2013 10:02 AM
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  • 3 Comments
How do you solve a problem like Marnie? If you're a writer for "Girls," it's currently a difficult one to puzzle out. The idea of having her and Hannah switch roles, with Marnie's life falling apart while her (former) best friend begins to have a taste of success, is a great one. And bringing to light some of the unsavory and unlikeable aspects of her personality to add a little of grime to the pretty face and fabulous dresses, is a nice touch too. But outside of that, Lena Dunham and co. haven't really figured out what to do with Marnie this season. Allison Williams has been more than game to follow her character on a downward spiral, from her brief drunken sexual encounter with Elijah to her misguided relationship with Booth. But at some point, this on again/off again thing with ex-boyfriend Charlie (Christopher Abbott) has got to end.

Mitch Hurwitz Says 'Arrested Development' Has No Movie Deal Yet & Will Arnett Says Enjoy What's Coming For Now

  • By Charlie Schmidlin
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  • March 11, 2013 9:24 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Before news of a fourth season of “Arrested Development” came out, there was the fervent anticipation of an ensemble film. Now that the new season is almost upon us, the film still remains the more talked-about prize. Creator Mitch Hurwitz, Jeffrey Tambor and Will Arnett came to SXSW over the weekend to discuss the film and, most importantly, to explain the circumstances surrounding the future of the show.

Recap: The Gang Returns In 'Girls' As Dreams & Disorder Take Center Stage

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 4, 2013 10:02 AM
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  • 1 Comment
After three episodes of detours, following the travails of Hannah (Lena Dunham), Ray (Alex Karpovsky) and Adam (Adam Driver), and the for-the-moment departed Jessa (Jemima Kirke), "Girls" gets the gang back together for yet another strong episode in which some of our favorite supporting players get to shine. For those feeling a bit let down by the recent experimental plays on form from Dunham, last night's episode returns to season one familiarity, with results just as winning as anything the show has done.

Recap: 'Parade's End' Brings Dense Miniseries To A Quiet Close In Finale

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 1, 2013 10:00 AM
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  • 5 Comments
As my colleagues have written in their recaps of the first four episodes of "Parade's End," there is much to admire in the five-part miniseries. From the dense, multi-threaded and layered script from Tom Stoppard, to the sumptuous direction from Susanna White and a cluster of great performances from Benedict Cumberbatch, Rebecca Hall, Adelaide Clemens, Stephen Graham and Rupert Everett. And at the middle of it all, perhaps one of the most buttoned up leading men we've seen in quite some time on the small screen, Christopher Tietjens. It would almost be laughable at how much his life has taken a downward turn since we met him at the start of the first episode, if it weren't so tragic. As an era fades, so too does a particular way of English, gentlemanly life, and Tietjens will hold on to it until it nearly destroys him. But after seeing nearly every facet of his life crumble and corrupted, you yearn for Christopher -- as his wife Sylvia long has -- to finally submit to some kind of emotion. To break free and reclaim his life. And while he doesn't quite do that in the finale, his victory such as it is, is satisfying in the way the character deserves.

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