The Playlist

Stream This: 'The Canyons,' Brian De Palma's 'Passion,' 'On The Road' & More On VOD This Week

  • By Emma Bernstein
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  • August 2, 2013 11:05 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Hey-o cinephiles, and welcome to the deluxe edition of Stream This. There was a lot to cover this week, with so many films being released on VOD concurrently or in advance of their theatrical debuts, and we didn't want to leave anything out, including those nifty themed picks. Thus, the result at hand: an extra-long version of the column, where we give you eight suggestions instead of six. (Don't worry, you won't have to buy special sheets or anything.) There's work from Brian De Palma, Paul Schrader, and Lynn Shelton to name a few, and all of it is either playing or will be playing shortly on a silver screen near you. In related news, James Ponsoldt's third film, "The Spectacular Now," opens this weekend to much critical praise from Sundance on down, so if you're looking to brush up on his canon, an earlier work is available to stream. Plus there's a largely forgotten Mark Wahlberg picture from the early 2000s to honor the "2 Guns" star while reminding us why we like artist formerly known as Marky Mark so damn much. And now, for our streaming picks of the week.

5 Great & 5 Disappointing English-Language Debuts By Foreign-Language Directors

  • By The Playlist Staff
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  • February 28, 2013 11:01 AM
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  • 11 Comments
This Friday sees the release of the much-anticipated "Stoker." The melodrama would probably be of note just because it stars Mia Wasikowksa and Nicole Kidman, but it's even more so because it marks the English-language debut of acclaimed Korean filmmaker Park Chan-Wook, the man behind "Sympathy For Mr. Vengeance," "Oldboy" and "Thirst," among others. The film lands hot on the heels of "The Last Stand," from Park's countryman Kim Ji-Woon, and a few months from the English-language debut of another Korean filmmaker, Bong Joon-Ho's "Snowpiercer." The three are only the latest international filmmakers to seek wider audiences and acclaim by making a film in the English language.

Scott Cooper Out, Walter Salles In To Direct 'The Man In The Rockefeller Suit'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 31, 2013 3:17 PM
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  • 0 Comments
For a while there, riding in the wake of the success of "Crazy Heart," director Scott Cooper put his name to a not insignificant number of potential projects, before finally mounting "Out Of The Furnace" last year. And it looks like one of those movies is moving on without him.

Walter Salles Talks The Influence Of Fathers In 'On The Road,' Working With Jose Rivera, Writing A Book About Jia Zhang Ke & More

  • By Erik McClanahan
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  • December 20, 2012 12:26 PM
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  • 2 Comments
On the fifth floor of the Hotel deLuxe in Portland, Oregon, Walter Salles seems content to talk at length about cinema. But alas, two publicists, worried the loquacious “On the Road” director will miss his train up to Seattle for another round of press and screenings of his latest film, a long-in-the-works adaptation of the seminal beat novel by Jack Kerouac, had to cut the conversation off. As I packed up my recording equipment, Salles took the opportunity to politely discuss the proper sound levels for projecting the film to the two publicists.

Review: Beat Classic 'On The Road' Comes To The Screen In Lustrous-But-Long-Winded Fashion

  • By James Rocchi
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  • December 18, 2012 6:34 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" has been heralded for decades: an important novel, a cultural signifier, a sociological landmark, a cracking good read. It's also been considered "unfilmable" -- but now Walter Salles ("The Motorcycle Diaries," "Dark Water") brings the novel to the screen, and "The Motorcycle Diaries" turns out to be a pretty good template for understanding how Salles has shot his adaptation. "On the Road," like 'Diaries,' is scenic and episodic, full of youth's passion but with a shade of the future yet to come dimming the brightness of its vision, as a charismatic young man travels with another young man, saying little but watching everything along the way.

James Franco & Joseph Gordon-Levitt Auditioned For The Leads In ‘On The Road’ & More From Screenwriter José Rivera

  • By Rodrigo Perez
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  • October 29, 2012 4:19 PM
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  • 16 Comments
While the screenings were canceled last evening because of Hurricane Sandy, BAMCinematek’s IFC Sneaks was in full force on Friday and Saturday nights. Playing seven IFC Films pictures that won’t be in theaters until later this year or 2013 (Abbas Kiarostami's "Like Someone In Love" and Olivier Assayas' "Something In The Air” for example), on Saturday night, BAM and IFC Films unveiled the New York premiere of Walter Salles’ “On The Road.” Salles’ long-time-coming adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s seminal Beat Generation novel was a five year work in progress, and on Saturday evening BAM screened the newly edited 124 minute version (the iteration that ran at Cannes was 2 hours and 20 minutes and some of the main criticisms of that version was its longwinded approach) that will open in theaters in December.

New, Shorter Cut Of 'On The Road' Will Premiere At The Toronto International Film Festival

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 28, 2012 1:49 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Decades in the making, the Francis Ford Coppola produced, Walter Salles directed "On The Road" finally premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May to a mixed response. The adaptation of Jack Kerouac's seminal novel of a generation was never the easiest thing to bring to the screen, and our review by James Rocchi from the Croisette called it "lustrous but long winded." And indeed, running nearly 2 hours and 20 minutes, this writer was definitely checking his watch during the film. Now as it heads to TIFF, it looks like Salles has hit the editing bay one more time for a new, slimmer cut.

Cannes: Walter Salles Talks The Long Journey To Make 'On The Road'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 27, 2012 1:17 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Given that the source material was once described by Truman Capote with the immortal epithet "That's not writing, that's typing," and is a generally unruly thing to adapt, it's not surprising that it's taken the best part of half-a-century to make a film of Jack Kerouac's beat classic "On The Road." Plans were in the works as early as the publication date in 1957 (Kerouac wanted to co-star in the film with Marlon Brando), and documentarian D.A. Pennebaker came close, but it's Francis Ford Coppola who's been the driving force, developing the project since the release of "Apocalypse Now" in 1979.

Walter Salles Working On Two New Screenplays, 'Terra' With Gael García Bernal & One With His 'Central Station' Star

  • By The Playlist
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  • May 26, 2012 1:31 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Brazilian director Walter Salles' path to adapting Jack Kerouac's "On The Road" has been a long and winding one that's taken about seven years to come to fruition. And while reviews out of Cannes about his new picture starring Garett Hedlund, Sam Riley, Kristen Stewart and more have been decidely mixed (read our review here), the film will finally arrive on U.S. shores in the late fall.

Cannes Review: Beat Classic 'On The Road' Comes To The Screen In Lustrous-But-Long-Winded Fashion

  • By James Rocchi
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  • May 23, 2012 7:29 AM
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  • 15 Comments
Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" has been heralded for decades: an important novel, a cultural signifier, a sociological landmark, a cracking good read. It's also been considered "unfilmable" -- but now Walter Salles ("The Motorcycle Diaries," "Dark Water") brings the novel to the screen, and "The Motorcycle Diaries" turns out to be a pretty good template for understanding how Salles has shot his adaptation. "On the Road," like 'Diaries,' is scenic and episodic, full of youth's passion but with a shade of the future yet to come dimming the brightness of its vision, as a charismatic young man travels with another young man, saying little but watching everything along the way.

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