The Playlist

NYFF '11 Review: 'We Can't Go Home Again' Is A Maddening, Fascinating Effort From Nicholas Ray

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • October 2, 2011 3:06 AM
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  • 0 Comments
In 1971 Nicholas Ray, former Hollywood director of "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Bigger Than Life," accepted a teaching position at Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at SUNY Binghamton University in upstate New York. At the time the university was seen as the epicenter of experimental and avant-garde art (the film program at Binghamton having been started by renowned experimental filmmaker Ken Jacobs). At some point during his two-year tenure, Ray moved into a house off campus with a group of his students and began collaborating on "We Can't Go Home Again," a project that would screen at Cannes in 1973 but was tinkered with, by Ray, until his death from cancer in 1979.

Oscilloscope Pulls A Criterion, Pick Up Rights To Nicholas Ray's Final Film 'We Can't Go Home Again'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • August 31, 2011 5:50 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Also Release New Documentary Don't Expect Too Much'We gotta hand it to Oscilloscope Laboratories. Founded by Beastie Boys member Adam Yauch, it could so easily have become a vanity DVD label without much influence or clout, but it has quickly risen to be strong independent player both theatrically and on home video. Their roster has accomodated a wide variety of strong films from "Bellflower," "Meek's Cutoff," "The Messenger," "Exit Through The Giftshop," "Dear Zachary" and much more. They have accommodated the arthouse and foreign films equally, and now are making a big stride into tackling classic films and directors.

New Restoration Of Nicholas Ray's 'We Can't Go Home Again' To Premiere At Venice & New York Fests

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 18, 2011 4:36 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Nicholas Ray is a truly fascinating figure. The filmmaker, who was born 100 years ago this year, directed a series of hugely influential pictures in the 1940s and 1950s, most notably "Johnny Guitar" and "Rebel Without a Cause," but never quite got the respect he was due in the States (although the Cahiers du Cinema crowd were obsessed with him), and spent much of his life in the throes of drug and alcohol addiction, working on difficult, experimental projects.

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