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The Playlist

What Are You Seeing This Weekend? 'Much Ado About Nothing' For 'The Internship;' 'Wish You Were Here' For 'The Purge'

  • By Emma Bernstein
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  • June 7, 2013 2:46 PM
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  • 0 Comments
The studios have been busy, it seems, preparing for this first June weekend. The bevy of comedies, thrillers, adaptations, docs, and psycho killer little girl stories landing at the multiplexes and art houses are like a big neon sign that reads, "SUMMERTIME!" And really, what says summer better than a movie about interning? (We're talking to you, college students.) Maybe one about a 12-hour period of sanctioned lawlessness? (That's for all those who remember when summer was actually a vacation.) Whatever hearkens the season best, there is so much on the release slate today, you may need a to-do list to make it through the titles. And we'd love to know which films will make your top slots, so clue us in using the comments section below!

Review: Alain Resnais' 'You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!'

  • By Peter Labuza
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  • June 6, 2013 6:29 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Alain Resnais is no stranger to the absurd. For over fifty years, his films—beginning with “Hiroshima, Mon Amour,” have asked questions through their oblique narratives about the way we think about story, performance, and cinema. But such a serious statement also obscures the pure delight it is to get lost in the filmmaker’s lush imagery and his pure sense of magic. Surrealism can spark at any moment, and never feels unnatural. And in “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!,” the filmmaker’s purported last film, he’s gone to new wild imaginations of delight, a true send off from one generation of cinematic legends to the next.

NYFF Review: Alain Resnais Makes A Delightful Final Film With 'You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!'

  • By Peter Labuza
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  • October 2, 2012 11:04 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Alain Resnais is no stranger to the absurd. For over fifty years, his films—beginning with “Hiroshima, Mon Amour,” have asked questions through their oblique narratives about the way we think about story, performance, and cinema. But such a serious statement also obscures the pure delight it is to get lost in the filmmaker’s lush imagery and his pure sense of magic. Surrealism can spark at any moment, and never feels unnatural. And in “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet!,” the filmmaker’s purported last film, he’s gone to new wild imaginations of delight, a true send off from one generation of cinematic legends to the next.

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