Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Tahar Rahim To Star Opposite Marion Cotillard In 'A Separation' Helmer Asghar Farhadi's Upcoming French-Language Effort

News
by Simon Dang
May 21, 2012 8:40 AM
6 Comments
  • |

Merely days after "A Separation" helmer Asghar Farhadi cast fellow Oscar winner Marion Cotillard in his mysterious French-language feature, the Iranian has added another prestigious Gallic talent to the project in actor Tahar Rahim.

Details of the story remain under wraps but the pic will see Rahim unite with fellow Jacques Audiard collaborator Cotillard for what Farhadi has described as an "emotional social thriller" in the vein of 'A Separation,' with multiple twists aimed at keeping the audience in suspense from the first frame to the last. It'll also mark the first time Farhadi has shot a film outside his native Iran with lensing to begin this fall on an €11 million budget.

After breaking out at Cannes three years ago with his award-winning role in Audiard's "A Prophet," Rahim has pretty much avoided the allure Hollywood and the bigger pay checks (aside from a part in Kevin MacDonald's "The Eagle"), instead deciding to stay in Europe working with name likes Lou Ye, Joachim Lafosse, Jean-Jacques Annaud and Ismaël Ferroukhi. Things look to be kicking up a gear in 2012 with this collaboration with Farhadi and Cotillard, as well as the planned finale to Faith Akin's Love, Death & The Devil Trilogy with "The Cut" -- both of which will surely see the actor return to major film festival red carpets early next year. [Variety]

Free Indie Movies and Documentaries    

6 Comments

  • Baddu | May 21, 2012 9:34 PMReply

    Sorry for the previous garbled text!

    This film in due time shall prove to be a milestone in Persian literature and drama. Noting the Western art critics accolades, in spite of lack of knowledge of the background and having to follow the story through fast moving, abbrevi­ated subtitles, one can only assume that A Separation shall also prove to be a milestone in world cinema, once more deeply studied. The most outstanding feature is the amount of compaction in content that the film has achieved, a modern necessity consid­ering the fast pace of modern life. If one is familiar with present and past of the Iranian culture and attentive enough to the details, there is enough in this two hour movie to outgun a Thomas Mann novel. This high level of compaction is achieved by relying on the viewer to fill in the details from gestures, clues, metaphors, allegories and knowledge of the Iranian socio-political scene. All these instruments can only be assembled under one roof in the cinema. In theater or literature you cannot use the exchange of the eye contact between Termeh and the little girl that speaks volumes about the corruption of the grown up world. Could Farhadi achieve the same hight in a French film, where he lacks the cultural background? My only consolation is that enough of the richness of 'A Separation' may have been lost to the occidental viewer that he may enjoy the French film even more than the original Persian masterpiece!

  • Kasra | May 22, 2012 3:33 AM

    After "Fireworks Wednesday" (which was a great film) he made "About Elly...". That was a surprise for everyone. After the great masterpiece "About Elly..." we didn't think that Farhadi can do it again. But he did it! He made another masterpiece. And I believe that he can do it again. (Excuse me for my poor English)

  • Baddu | May 21, 2012 8:38 PMReply

    This film in due time shall prove to be a mile­stone in Per­sian ‘lit­er­a­ture’ and drama. Not­ing the West­ern art crit­ics’ acco­lades, in spite of lack of knowl­edge of the back­ground and hav­ing to fol­low the story through fast mov­ing, abbre­vi­ated sub­ti­tles, one can only assume that A Sep­a­ra­tion shall also prove to be a mile­stone in world cin­ema, once more deeply studied.
    The most out­stand­ing fea­ture is the amount of com­paction in con­tent that the film has achieved, a mod­ern neces­sity con­sid­er­ing the fast pace of mod­ern life. If one is famil­iar with present and past of the Iran­ian cul­ture and atten­tive enough to the details, there is enough in this two hour movie to outgun a Thomas Mann novel. This high level of com­paction is achieved by rely­ing on the viewer to fill in the details from ges­tures, clues, metaphors, alle­gories and knowl­edge of the Iran­ian socio-political scene. All these instru­ments can only be assem­bled under one roof in the cin­ema. In the­ater or or lit­er­a­ture you can­not use the exchange of the eye con­tact between Ter­meh and the lit­tle girl that speaks vol­umes about the cor­rup­tion of the grown up world. Could Farhadi achieve the same hight in a French film, where he lacks the cultural background?
    My only consolation is that enough of the richness of 'A Separation' may have been lost to the occidental viewer that he may enjoy the French film even more than the original Persian masterpiece!

  • Cobraverde | May 21, 2012 10:22 AMReply

    Logical reason? The film in question, "A Separation", is an excellent film, by any standards; full of intriguing human drama and stellar performances. The politics, though no doubt relevant, are secondary. Iran banning and locking up its own film makers is bound to illicit a response, political or otherwise, from other countries and fellow artists.

  • blaze | May 21, 2012 9:41 AMReply

    this is stupid . for politic,they gave oscar and now great actress and great budget for another movie . there were many great Iranian movie in the past like" so close so far " , " a bite of beard ( I don't sure about translation ) what happen for them. they can rise a person without logical reason

  • Kasra | May 22, 2012 3:28 AM

    Any movie needs a good distributer for being successful in America. The films that you mentioned didn't have good distributers. Like Farhadi's previous masterpiece "About Elly..." that didn't have any distributers in America. If you are Iranian you can read this:

    http://www.cinetmag.com/UsersArticleShow.asp?page=7&SORT=&USATID=52727

Email Updates