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2013: The Best Films Of The Year...So Far

Features
by The Playlist Staff
June 4, 2013 2:56 PM
69 Comments
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Frances Ha
Noah Baumbach's last couple of movies ("Margot at the Wedding," "Greenberg") were so glum and dour that they gave off the sensation of physical weight; they literally dragged you down. So it comes as something of a surprise that "Frances Ha" is such an effervescent bobble – a fizzy pop confection that's equally indebted to the French New Wave, Woody Allen and the collection of soul and disco songs sprinkled throughout the soundtrack (has a Hot Chocolate jam ever been put to better use?) Inspired by Baumbach's co-writer/muse/girlfriend/star Greta Gerwig (in a truly breakout performance), "Frances Ha" investigates the incredibly specific emotional space between two female friends and the way that life, cresting the 30-year-mark, seems to become less about hope and promise and more about compromise and concessions. It's a movie about easing into adulthood in a city (New York) where everyone thinks that they're still eighteen. Captured in timeless, velvety black-and-white, "Frances Ha" is a movie so effortlessly joyful that it almost bounces across the screen. As a struggling dancer dealing with the dissolution of her longtime relationship, a fractured relationship with her former best friend/roommate, and a series of creative endeavors that never seem to pan out, Gerwig's Frances is someone who pinballs through life without much thought. You get the impression that she would devolve into one of Baumbach's surly, self-centered misanthropes if she ever slowed down long enough to evaluate the situation. Thankfully she never does. [Read our review]

"The Kings Of Summer"
It's hardly been a great year for American comedy on the big screen -- not when the biggest hits have been "The Hangover Part III" and "Identity Thief," anyway. But there's one shining exception that's been brightening up the landscape since Sundance, and is starting to make its way into theaters. We've had high hopes for director Jordan Vogt-Roberts since his short "Successful Alcoholics" a few years back, but we're not sure we were prepared for how truly excellent his first feature, "The Kings Of Summer" is. An interesting companion piece to "Mud," the film tells the story of two best friends (future megastar Nick Robinson, "Super 8" actor Gabriel Basso) who, fed up with their overbearing parents (including Nick Offerman, in his best non "Parks and Rec" performance to date), and with the help of show-stealing oddball Biaggio (Moises Arias), build a house in the woods where they can act like grown-ups. Existing in a timeless not-quite-reality that tips its hat to '80s classics like "Stand By Me" and "The Goonies" while blending it with an up-to-the-minute sense of humor that betrays Vogt-Roberts' links with the current comedy scene (big-name stand-ups like Kumail Nanjiani and Hannibal Burress have cameos), it's certainly the funniest film we've seen in 2013 so far, minute by minute. And yet it's also proof that capital-C comedy doesn't have to be as disposable as its studio counterparts; it spins the trend of the last few years on its head, and rather than following adults caught in arrested development, it's about kids who are racing prematurely to an adulthood that they're not quite ready for yet. What's more, in contrast to the flat, ugly look of most cinematic laughers, it's a genuinely beautiful-looking film, capturing those endless summer days where anything seems possible. Like every debut feature, it's imperfect, but this is what Vogt-Roberts can do first time at bat, we're dying to see what he comes up with second time around. [Read our review]

Sightseers
If Alexander Payne went to England and decided to cheekily remake "Natural Born Killers," it would probably look something like "Sightseers," Ben Wheatley's latest humanist horror comedy. It doesn't have the quite the same collect-your-bearings whoosh of Wheatley's last film, "Kill List," but it's equally impressive for different reasons. Instead of wild tonal shifts there are subtle fluctuations in mood and style; this is a "straight" comedy twisted and inverted and dipped in coal-black tar. It helps that Wheatley and his stars/co-writers Alice Lowe and Steve Oram so fully inhabit this world that, while barbed and satirical, the movie never comes across as condescending. It's terribly sincere, even when its characters are doing terrible things. As a pair of dumpy suburban England schlubs who decide to go camping, Lowe and Oram become these characters, people who are probably together because no one else would have anything to do with them. When the trip goes from hilariously banal to genuinely bloody, it seems like a natural progression – everyone has been on the vacation that they would kill to get out of, these two just take that literally. "Sightseers" is easily one of the funniest movies released this year, and even more so because each laugh carries with it an equally jolting shock. So bloody good. [Read our Cannes 2012 review]

The Place Beyond The Pines
If Derek Cianfrance's "Blue Valentine" was the perfect debut rock album, simple and toothsome and pure, then "The Place Beyond the Pines" is the "difficult" sophomore album, where the musicians have decided to add all sorts of potentially problematic embellishments, things like strings and children's choirs and 8-minute-long prog breakdowns. It doesn't knock you for the same emotional loop but you can't help but goggle at its seemingly bottomless ambition and novelistic zeal. Employing a uniquely assured structure, "The Place Beyond The Pines" is equal parts family drama and sprawling crime epic, and while its thematic concerns ("the sins of the father" is a big one) sometimes threaten to topple what is an occasionally wobbly enterprise with a number of moving parts, it still manages to resonate emotionally. Ryan Gosling is a motorcycle stunt driver-turned-bank robber who falls in love with Eva Mendes' small-town girl and ends up fathering a child. Bradley Cooper is the cop intent on bringing him down and… That's all you can say about the movie's plot without threatening to ruin some of the many wonderful twists and turns. The movie jumps forward in time without so much as a title card indicating as much; with just two movies under his belt, it's clear that Cianfrance is a director obsessed with what time does to relationships and his gorgeously naturalistic, assured approach to the depiction of time is part of what makes "The Place Beyond The Pines" so powerful. As far as second albums go, it's a wonder. [Read our review]

Beyond The Hills
It’s winter in rural Romania, but it’s more than the chill of the season that’s instilling a damp discomfort in the bones of the characters in Cristian Mungiu’s “Beyond The Hills.” The arrival of Alina (Cristina Flutur) to a strictly orthodox religious compound to visit her friend, and possible former lover Voichita (Cosmina Straten) to convince her to leave so they can be together, sets off a chain of events that are grim, surreal and undeniably powerful. Mungiu, who came to international attention with “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days,” once again employs his favored long takes, with minimal movement, to possibly even subtler effect here, with results that are no less devastating. This is really the story of two kinds of obsession that can crush the soul -- faith and love -- and how the zeal of the former, can overtake the latter to the point of obliterating all compassion. Stratan and Flutur shared the Best Actress prize in 2012 at Cannes and it’s easy to see why. They both deliver tremendous turns, finding nuances of pain, longing, devotion and more that enrich Mungiu’s thematically ambitious film. It's a film in which possession of the soul -- by God or the devil -- locks humanity out of the heart, but the commitment of love could be the most powerful force to fight it. [Our review is here]

"Behind The Candelabra"
The most impressive trick (among many) that the glitzy, gaudy, exuberant Liberace biopic “Behind the Candelabra” pulls off is in dealing even-handedly with a star who was so much larger than life that the temptation to render him as a caricature must have been all but overwhelming. But Steven Soderbergh, with characteristic restraint and intelligence, avoids this trap, a feat made doubly impressive by that fact that, in basing the film on ex-lover Scott Thorson’s book, the material would easily have been there for a character assassination. But ‘Candelabra’ isn’t a hagiography either, it's a nuanced and surprisingly touching look at late-life Liberace, his moments of monstrousness (having Thorson undergo plastic surgery to look more like a younger version of himself is possibly the oogiest) balanced by moments of great tenderness and love, the rawer and realer for coming from beneath layers of lurex and sequins. But of course all the directorial good intentions in the world would be nothing without the performances to embody all these subtleties, and in Matt Damon’s wide-eyed, gradually wising-up Thorson and Michael Douglas’s jaw-droppingly brilliant Liberace, Soderbergh finds the beating heart of the picture. Both actors are on career-best form here, though Douglas, perhaps deservedly will grab the majority of the limelight for his revelatory turn -- nothing he’s done before even hinted at the level of commitment and humanity he brings to Lee. Of course, it’s a sad irony that ‘Candelabra’ with its meticulous period detailing and flamboyant sets and costumes, is one of Soderbergh’s most big-screen-worthy films, but it will be a small-screen experience for many U.S. viewers, still, the film’s greatest strengths are its storytelling and characterization which simply sing, off screens of any size. [Read our review from Cannes 2013]

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69 Comments

  • jw | October 12, 2013 1:24 PMReply

    great list. a lot i haven't seen but my top 5 is currently: The Act of Killing, Upstream Color, Blue Jasmine, To the Wonder, Frances Ha (and Sightseers if that gets counted as this year)

  • jimmy | October 1, 2013 8:58 AMReply

    watch best Movies of Bollywood and Hollywood.
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  • Corey | September 4, 2013 7:23 PMReply

    Do us all a favor and maybe in your movies reviews, tell us what the movie is about you turd! No one reading this is going to have any idea what these movies are about. Over laden with your slick wording and cheesy descriptions of what the directors were "trying to do" we dont care. tell us about the movie....thats all thats it.

  • Paxton | June 30, 2013 1:06 PMReply

    Only God Forgives is one of the most bold and daring films this year (I'm surprised it at least didn't make the honorable mentions list). No one even fought over it?

  • tyrannosaurus max | July 8, 2013 5:10 AM

    Let's hope God forgives the playlist for such an exclusion, because we sure as hell aren't going to...

  • Jake | June 21, 2013 1:39 AMReply

    Maybe I missed it (only skimmed this article) but what about The Sapphires?

  • Aasif Faiz | June 20, 2013 11:57 AMReply

    what about Stoker, i thought it was a stunning film

  • Miles Valentine | June 18, 2013 12:18 PMReply

    GIMME THE LOOT

  • maribeth hendrickson | June 14, 2013 2:33 PMReply

    No one has mentioned WHAT MAISIE KNEW. It's an extraordinary and sensitive depiction of a young girl's responses to the petty, immature, vitriolic relationships she sees between her divorced parents and then between each of them and their new lovers. Those subtle and perceptive reactions are almost always played out on her incredibly expressive face. Her words are spare and unnecessary given her magnificent acting talent. What comes through clearly is the emotional devastation caused by careless, narcissistic adults whose painful impact on their children is not even noted.

  • maribeth hendrickson | June 14, 2013 2:23 PMReply

    No one has mentioned WHAT MAISIE KNEW. It's an extraordinary and sensitive depiction of a young girl's responses to the petty, immature, vitriolic relationships she sees between her divorced parents and then between each of them and their new lovers. Those subtle and perceptive reactions are almost always played out on her incredibly expressive face. Her words are spare and unnecessary given her magnificent acting talent. What comes through clearly is the emotional devastation caused by careless, narcissistic adults whose painful impact on their children is not even noted.

  • maribeth hendrickson | June 14, 2013 2:22 PMReply

    No one has mentioned WHAT MAISIE KNEW. It's an extraordinary and sensitive depiction of a young girl's responses to the petty, immature, vitriolic relationships she sees between her divorced parents and then between each of them and their new lovers. Those subtle and perceptive reactions are almost always played out on her incredibly expressive face. Her words are spare and unnecessary given her magnificent acting talent. What comes through clearly is the emotional devastation caused by careless, narcissistic adults whose painful impact on their children is not even noted.

  • Anonymous | June 10, 2013 8:25 PMReply

    Most Anticipated Movies:
    This Is The End
    Man of Steel
    World War Z
    The Heat
    Despicable Me 2
    Much Ado About Nothing
    Pacific Rim
    Red 2
    The Wolverine
    Elysium
    Kick-Ass 2
    Monsters University
    Thor: The Dark World
    Inside Lleywn Davis
    Ender's Game
    Gravity
    Runner, Runner
    The World's End
    The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
    Riddick
    Captain Phillips
    Delivery Man
    The Bling Ring
    The Way, Way Back
    Turbo
    Planes
    Last Vegas

  • Anonymous | June 10, 2013 8:05 PMReply

    Best:
    Mud
    Iron Man 3
    Star Trek Into Darkness
    Oz: The Great and Powerful
    Stories We Tell
    The Croods
    The Place Beyond The Pines
    Stoker
    Pain & Gain

    So-So:
    42
    Spring Breakers
    Oblivion
    Jack the Giant Slayer

    Worst:
    After Earth
    The Incredible Burt Wonderstone

  • Simon Opitz | June 10, 2013 4:26 PMReply

    Place Beyond The Penis, which is my most hated film of the year, and no Spring Breakers? come on.

  • Ben Kingsley | July 20, 2013 10:13 PM

    You sound like you have awful taste :(

  • Kenny Orvinets | June 11, 2013 2:03 PM

    It's Place Beyond The ''Pines'' not ''Penis''

  • Nick Ondras | June 9, 2013 8:50 PMReply

    "Side Effects" is a great movie -- twisty, creepy, and all sorts of uncomfortable. Career bests from Mara and Jude Law. Not since "Looper" have I seen a script so air-tight and bulletproof, and -- paired with Soderbergh's usual flair for muddy, vacuum-sealed directing -- not even the haywire nature of the third act is enough to derail "Side Effects". Hell, it might ultimately even make it what it is. Ditto "Spring Breakers". A truly exciting, DIFFERENT party film.

  • Anton | July 4, 2013 3:46 PM

    What. Looper has a fuckin terrible script. In terms of logic, at least. I knot that 'suspension of disbelief' stuff, but ohmygod, you have to completely turn your brains off to ignore the stupidity.

  • Nick Ondras | June 9, 2013 8:51 PM

    "To the Wonder" and "Pines" are my favorites of the year so far. Great list regardless.

  • Ssssppprrriiiiinnnnng Bbbbbbrrrrreaaaakkkkkk | June 8, 2013 3:10 PMReply

    Spring Breakers
    This is the End
    Oz the Great and Powerful
    Mud
    The Iceman

  • DomizianoA | June 7, 2013 7:03 PMReply

    Ok, i appreciate this great eye to all this new wave of cinema and in fact i have loved so many, but, i am very disappointed that anyone has even mentioned "The Company you Keep" a film from Robert Redford, i found touching and important despite its (few) flaws! Julie Christie's performance was exceptional and should be considered for Awards, she's always mesmerizing, whatever she does, and, we owe her a lot! For example, Sally Potter, who was able in 1983 to make her very first film an International (feminist) sensation just thanks to the presence and the work of Christie, in it! Or Sarah Polley whom became a terrific director thanks to Christie's work in "Away from Her" for whom she should have won the Oscar! I am sorry, but Cotilliard lip synching and made up to perfection by the best costume designer and make up artists was nothing next to Christie's understated, chilling, complex and ultimately surprising, Fiona in Polley's acclaimed film debut! And, "The Company you Keep" was touching, simple, and, far more important than many others you listed, especially Derek Cianfrance's new film "Beyond the Pines" really muddled, tedious , and, so wanna be Hollywood, without even getting close, a true disappointment(note that I loved and adored "Blue Valentine")! I loved then Sally Potter's "Ginger and Rosa", i loved Sarah Polley's new genius in "Story we Tell" a real study in depth, and, a never ending surprise of observation, i loved "To the Wonder", i liked very much "The Hunt" by Thomas Vinterberg, adored "Hide your smiling Faces" (let's hope this formidable director doesn't sell out to Hollywood any time too soon, like too many others!), and liked both "Blue Bird" and David Gordon Green's finally finding clearly his filmmaking best in "Prince Avalanche"! I liked Shane Carruth's "Upstream Color" truly brilliant, and Ozon's extraordinary "In the House". "Frances Ha" was stylish, but i would not include this in the list of best films of the year! However.. "The Gustibust not disputandum est" they used to say in ancient Rome! Now, not one, one single mention for "The East"? Uhm...
    Oh thank you for mentioning "Ain't them Bodies Saint", and, "No" 2 examples of brave Cinema also!
    But, please, again i am shocked this attention to "A place beyond the Pines" a truly bad film and not a mention for "The Company you Keep" and "The East"! That truly disappoints me!
    And, I'd rather not comment a few other choices..
    Oh, i must say, for all of those like me who love Ryan Gosling and great cinema.. Just wait for "Only God Forgives" a sensational film! Terrific, and Scott Thomas also shall be back to Awards with this turn! It would be great to have Scott Thomas, Julie Christie and Brit Marling all nominated!
    And Ryan Gosling, back on too, for "Only God Forgives"! I hope reason will finally come back!
    One mention for the worst film: "The Great Gatsby" followed by "Star Trek". Ewwww!!!!

  • Nick Ondras | June 9, 2013 8:53 PM

    Absolutely with you on "The East". Looking forward to it greatly. "OGF" and "The Bling Ring" are my most-anticipated this summer.

  • DomizianoA | June 7, 2013 7:13 PM

    Sorry... a few "typo's" I meant: I am very disappointed that nobody has even mentioned "The Company you Keep".. I forgot to mention that Sally Potter's exceptional first film (just finally out in Blue Ray), and, starring an everlasting Icon, such as Julie Christie, was called "The Gold Diggers" (1983 and it was shot in Iceland, believe it or not!).
    Also, i am sorry, i meant.. "Away from Her" for which Christie should have won the Oscar, of course!
    And finally, Sarah Polley, WHO has became such a terrific director.. of course! Again, I apologize for my mistakes! Thank you for reading through them!

  • Tyrannosaurus Max | June 6, 2013 9:14 PMReply

    I know it's not really 'out' yet but guyyyyysss c'mon, ONLY GOD FORGIVES!!!!
    and I'm not just blowing smoke out of my ass, I was in France last week and actually got to see it and I can't believe the reaction it's gotten so far. Damn good film.

  • Daniel Delago | June 6, 2013 6:32 AMReply

    Good list, Indiewire! 'The Place Beyond the Pines' was the most frustrating disappointment of the year. After Ryan Gosling exits the film, the story meanders into melodramatic garbage. The third act with the teens is horrible. I kept looking at my watch. The worst performance was the kid who played Bradley Cooper's son. It was a cheesy 'Brando' impression that didn't work.

    So glad you didn't list 'Spring Breakers.' That film is just sexploitation of Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens. Sure, they look good in a bikini but the film was paper thin. It was more like a music video.

    'Mud' is excellent by the way. Also, Shane Carruth's 'Upstream Color' is brilliant. Looking forward to seeing 'Frances Ha' this weekend and reviewing it. Cannes Film Festival showcased some amazing indies too. You gotta love the French, they have the best taste in art films.

  • Susan | June 5, 2013 5:57 PMReply

    I cannot believe that you thought Avalanche was good. It was terrible and terribly boring. I saw it at Tribeca and people couldn't wait to get out. You should be embarrassed for including it on this list. Really horrible.

    How about HARMONY LESSONS? By far, the best film I saw at Tribeca. Brilliantly filmed and quite surprising. Amazing! Try to see it.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:58 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:58 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:58 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:57 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:57 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:55 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:55 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:55 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:51 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:51 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:51 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • Bob Aloo | June 5, 2013 3:50 PMReply

    Sally Potter's Ginger & Rosa; François Ozon's In The House; Pablo Berger's Blancanieves; and Cristian Mungiu's Beyond The Hills.
    I agree, keep it to what was actually released this year and make a separate article about the best from film festivals this year. Two separate beasts.

  • adf | June 5, 2013 2:40 PMReply

    STILL TRYING TO MAKE UPSTREAM COLOR HAPPEN. SORRY, GUYS. IT'S NEVER GOING TO HAPPEN.

  • Rick Horne | June 5, 2013 2:37 PMReply

    No mention of Fruitvale Station? Not even in honorable mention?????

  • Sakul | June 5, 2013 8:17 AMReply

    What Maisie Knew!

  • MDL | June 4, 2013 10:16 PMReply

    You should only include films that have gotten a theatrical release. Some of these films won't get a release until 2014. Most critics take into this into consideration. As should you guys.

  • Evan | June 4, 2013 10:08 PMReply

    Favorites that I have seen are Mud, Beyond the Hills, No, Side Effects, and Behind the Candelabra. Still haven't seen as much as I would like but I guess that is what happens when you go to school in a small North Carolina town.

  • Glass | June 4, 2013 9:21 PMReply

    This has been a pretty exceptional year so far, shaping up to be way better than 2011 & 2012

  • Matthew Starr | June 4, 2013 8:11 PMReply

    The Act of Killing was released?

  • THOR | June 4, 2013 6:52 PMReply

    1. Vampire (2011)
    2. Laurence Anyways
    3. Silver Bullets
    4. Everyday
    5. The End of Love
    6. To the Wonder
    7. Something in the Air

    I haven't seen any movies not available on video.

  • bertrand | June 4, 2013 5:41 PMReply

    What Maisie Knew was the best so far.

  • Adam Frazier | June 4, 2013 5:34 PMReply

    Drinking Buddies, Rewind This!, Much Ado About Nothing, The Spectacular Now, Maniac, You're Next, Zero Charisma are all worthy of consideration as well...

  • Richard Harris | June 4, 2013 5:10 PMReply

    My Top 10 So Far:

    1.Sping Breakers-A+
    2.Pain and Gain-A+
    3.Frances Ha-A+
    4.The Place Beyond the Pines-A+
    5.Mud-A
    6.Fast and Furious 6-A
    7.Iron Man 3-A
    8.The Kings of Summer-A-
    9.Behind the Candelabra-A-
    10.Stories We Tell-A-

  • Pat | June 4, 2013 4:38 PMReply

    Best so far (released): Frances Ha, Blancanieves, Lore, Mud, Molly Maxwell, The Ghosts in Our Machine, Hannah Arendt (counting Stories We Tell as 2012)
    Best from fests/coming soon: 15 Reasons to Live, Life and Crimes of Doris Payne, Muscle Shoals, Ernest et Celestine, 7 Boxes

  • wes | June 4, 2013 7:40 PM

    Oh man, I really want to watch Blancanieves!

  • Kiel | June 4, 2013 4:34 PMReply

    TO THE WONDER is the best film of 2013 thus far. Nothing else comes close.

  • Luke | June 4, 2013 4:05 PMReply

    What about Park Chan-wook gorgeously shot 'STOKER'? It features amazing performances from Wasikowska and Goode. It's a marvelous piece of character study.

  • Li | June 5, 2013 7:34 AM

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

  • Edward Davis | June 4, 2013 10:34 PM

    LOL

  • Laurence | June 4, 2013 3:53 PMReply

    LORE absolutely deserves to be in this list, and LAURENCE ANYWAYS absolutely deserves a mention, somehow only just now getting a US release. The latter is likely my favourite film of the year thus far.

  • Jamie | June 4, 2013 3:52 PMReply

    Mine Top 5 would be No, Mud, Beyond the Hills, Compliance and Behind the Candelabra. Reviews of all of these can be found on http://emptyscreens.com

  • DG | June 4, 2013 3:51 PMReply

    Best of the year so far- Upstream Color Most underrated- Stories we Tell Most overrated- Frances Ha

  • thislalife | June 4, 2013 3:48 PMReply

    Why don't you include some movies that civilians can see in theaters. Dayuum have these movies won't come out until the Fall

  • Nathan Duke | June 4, 2013 3:47 PMReply

    Overall, a decent list - but I'd certainly add "To the Wonder" and "Side Effects" to that list and remove "Upstream Color," which I believe is hands down the most overrated film of the year so far.

  • Ignacio | June 4, 2013 3:43 PMReply

    Side Effects is an underrated movie , there's something strange about that movie, that grabs your attention in a unsettling way. Rooney Mara gave quite a performance, and despite the seemingly cheesy turn towards erotic thriller territory, it's a movie that demands more that one viewing.

  • AndyB | June 5, 2013 11:51 AM

    So you can watch the lesbian makeout scenes? It's a thriller without thrills that looks like a TV movie and tries to portray it has something more deep and meaningful to say (in this case about overprescribing medications). I'm glad 'Candelabra' finally shook Soderbergh out of the warmed over TV movie phase he's been in since "Che".

  • AndyB | June 5, 2013 11:51 AM

    So you can watch the lesbian makeout scenes? It's a thriller without thrills that looks like a TV movie and tries to portray it has something more deep and meaningful to say (in this case about overprescribing medications). I'm glad 'Candelabra' finally shook Soderbergh out of the warmed over TV movie phase he's been in since "Che".

  • Wes | June 4, 2013 3:37 PMReply

    Upstream Color is my favorite so far. Trance is the worst movie I've seen in a long time.

  • ART | June 4, 2013 4:04 PM

    I agree about "Trance". I still makes me mad when I think about it. I liked very much "Klip" by Maja Milos, Matias Pineiro's "Viola", the Uruguayan "So Much Water" and the documentary "Leviathan" (probably most of them came out in 2012 in the US). Oh, and guys? Way to be a tease about "Man of Steel".

  • James | June 4, 2013 3:53 PM

    Completely agreed on both counts. UC knocked my socks off. I saw Trance with Danny Boyle in attendance to talk about it afterward, and I still wish I had skipped it (though he is a really cool guy and a very gracious interviewee). Terrible film. Enough with the big dumb Shyamalanian plot twists already.

  • liz | June 4, 2013 3:35 PMReply

    Two films featuring the talented Jim Sturgess, missed the cut. Unfortunately, both have gone straight to DVD. The first film, "The Best Offer," also features Geoffrey Rush and Donald Sutherland and was directed by the esteemed Giuseppe Tornatore. It also features a soundtrack scored by Ennio Morricone. Beautifully shot primarily in Trieste, Italy, it centers around the Art Auction elites. There are so many layers and twists in this film, and the acting is extremely impressive. And then there's "Ashes," also featuring the great Ray Winstone, about a son who breaks his father -- who's afflicted with Alzheimers, out of a hospital for nefarious reasons. Both films should be given the attention they truly deserve.

  • cirkusfolk | June 4, 2013 3:20 PMReply

    Glad u included Place Beyond the Pines. So far it's my favorite movie of the year.

  • eduardo | June 4, 2013 3:20 PMReply

    I'd say Side Effects deserves a mention, but otherwise it's a solid list. Some of those I haven't seen obviously (Llewyn Davis and Blue for example). The only one I didn't care for was the hackneyed The Place Beyond the Pines.

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