The Mad Ones: U.K. Trailer For 'On The Road' With Kristen Stewart, Garrett Hedlund, Viggo Mortensen & More

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by Kevin Jagernauth
August 6, 2012 10:44 AM
7 Comments
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Often put in the category of an unfilmable book, and in the works for decades, this fall will finally see Walter Salles' long-awaited, star studded adaptation of Jack Kerouac's "On The Road" hit theaters. And after plenty of posters, clips and promo material before the Cannes Film Festival where it premiered this spring, this brand new trailer offers the most extensive look at the film yet.

Led by Garrett Hedlund, Sam Riley and Kristen Stewart, Walter Salles' film attempts to capture the freewheeling nature of the Beat classic, and while James Rocchi approved of the film back in May, this writer was decidedly less taken with the movie that, running nearly 2 hours and 20 minutes, is almost too much for its own good. However, it should be noted that the performances are all strong, from the youthful leads to dudes like Viggo Mortensen and Steve Buscemi and step in and knock small appearances out of the park.

IFC Films and Sundance Selects picked up the film and have it slated for as yet unannounced late fall release this year. Check out the trailer below. 

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7 Comments

  • helen | August 9, 2012 1:16 PMReply

    It's a great movie. Critics suck big time, they need to get laid, that's all. Garrett Hedlund is a BABE.

  • gabe | August 7, 2012 2:20 PMReply

    More curious than excited about the movie, have to say. Of interest: John Tytell has written a good history on Kerouac and the making of the Beat Generation, which is now an e-single. A great read, for those interested: http://goo.gl/HS2f1

  • Nia | August 7, 2012 9:42 AMReply

    looks wonderful

  • jingmei | August 7, 2012 5:34 AMReply

    Fucking love it.

  • Tina | August 6, 2012 11:33 PMReply

    I'd rather eat excrement than see this movie

  • stella | August 6, 2012 1:15 PMReply

    I've seen the film and nothing that I've read so far does justice to this devastatingly beautiful film. Actually I've read so many ridiculous reviews about it that they wind up being almost embarrassing to read. They're even accusing the actors of being too beautiful, ('pretty faces' - have you heard that expression before?) ignoring completely that Neal, Jack, Luanne and Carolyn were all stunningly beautiful people, especially at the time the film takes place. All of them were just 20 year old kids who looked like gorgeous movie-stars, not bitter middle age subliterates like the 'critics' who just can't see beyond their cheap prejudices and clichés. The actors are all exceptional, especially Garrett Hedlund, with his spectacular performance as Dean Moriarty. It's really sad to see how critics are completely lost here and not even knowing how ridiculous they sound. Shame. Thank god I didn't listen to them and went to the theaters to see it by myself. This is a film in which you have to throw yourself into it. If you're stting there feeling you're better than Kerouac and OTR (because, you know, critics obey Capote, they are as good as him probably as writers) you will miss the whole point of it. You'll be missing its devastatingly beautiful and incredibly emotional end. You'll miss the intense eroticism, the crazy orgies and, afterwards, the innoncence ending for them all in the most painful way. I won't forget its poetry as long as I live. 'A Beatnik debauchery' as they often call this film trying to criticise it, is what On The Road is about indeed so that's not even a criticism, it's pure envy. The Guardian often do that. But that's just for those who had the courage to live it, not for those who sit comfortably behind their computers doing nothing but criticise those who they secretly envy. If you're not too uptight or sexually repressed to be jealous of those brave, handsome and daring guys, you'll be loving this raw, risky and marvellous film. Otherwise, go see The King's Speech. It's more the type of middle-aged movie you'll be comfortable with.

  • Kurskij | August 6, 2012 3:34 PM

    Thanks for a different look at it. It's refreshing.

    If it somehow translates the "feel" of the book - I'll be more than happy, and so far it looks like it does. Cause it's the atmosphere that was considered unfilmable, not the text itself (not to take away from the brilliance).

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