'The Beaver' Gets February 11, 2011 U.K. Release Date

by Oliver Lyttelton
November 8, 2010 1:48 AM
4 Comments
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Almost as soon as Mel Gibson had tapes leaked of conversations with the mother of his child, in which threats to burn her house down were the least offensive of the many statements directed at her, one question emerged in the movie world: what would happen to the Jodie Foster-helmed "The Beaver?"

The film, the script for which had topped the 2008 Black List, stars Gibson, alongside Foster, Anton Yelchin and Jennifer Lawrence, as a family man who develops a dual personality through the titular puppet he begins to wear on his arm. The film had picked up some strong buzz, with Gibson's performance deemed likely to mark a comeback for the troubled star, and many had pegged him as a potential awards nominee. Until, of course, he lost his damn mind again, in a manner that makes his character in "The Beaver" look positively well-balanced.

Speculation has been all over the park as to the fate of the film, with recent rumors suggesting that it could go straight to DVD, while Jeff Wells recently ran with some speculation that the film may have its ending reshot to be more palatable (although the piece appears to have been pulled - it was found here, but in case it does reappear, beware of major spoilers). Most have pegged that the film would see a release sometime in 2011, and that's looking more likely -- particularly as it now has a release date somewhere in the world.

Digital Spy noticed that the film has been given a release date in the U.K., and it's surprisingly soon: it will open on February 11th, against "Black Swan," "Just Go With It," "No Strings Attached" and "Yogi Bear." It's being distributed by Icon, the British/Australian distributor founded and owned by Gibson himself -- it obviously helps if the disgraced star of your latest movie also owns the company releasing it...

U.K. releases have a habit of slipping rather more than in the U.S., so we wouldn't be surprised if the release date moved again, but it's good to see that the film will soon be able to speak for itself -- the script was very good, and the cast are excellent. Whether British audiences are able to stomach Gibson in a lead role remains to be seen, but considering that Britain has hundreds of years of colonial history involving rape, pillage and generally being unpleasant to people in foreign lands, it's not entirely surprising that Icon feel it may be a little more receptive to Gibson... We'd expect to see a trailer sometime soon, if the date holds, and we'll make sure to be at the earliest screening that we can get into.

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4 Comments

  • Matt | November 17, 2010 9:45 AMReply

    I want to echo Emily's sentiments. Why the cheap shot at Great Britain? It's not like us Americans haven't done some pretty awful things in our rich cultural history. You may recall the widespread exploitation and massacre of Native Americans or that unfortunate time in which we thought slavery was hunky dory. I suspect there was some rape and pillaging involved in those two rather obvious examples of brutality in American history.

    Anyway, that you slammed the Brits takes the whole focus off of what the article was supposed to be about.

  • Oliver Lyttelton | November 13, 2010 12:25 AMReply

    Emily, Christmas is coming up. Would now be a good time to ask your loved ones for a sense of humor? It's the gift that keeps on giving.

  • Emily | November 12, 2010 11:10 AMReply

    I actually find your comment quite offensive, i was interested in reading your article as i would love to watch The Beaver, and have been waiting for a long time like alot of people to see it, and being British i wondered why they would set a release date in the UK for the film before the US, but reading your comment....'Whether British audiences are able to stomach Gibson in a lead role remains to be seen, but considering that Britain has hundreds of years of colonial history involving rape, pillage and generally being unpleasant to people in foreign lands, it’s not entirely surprising that Icon feel it may be a little more receptive to Gibson…' I really don't think the past colonial history of Britain or any other country for that matter was the reason why they chose to release The Beaver film in the UK in February 2011, a very disappointing read indeed!

  • Alex | November 8, 2010 4:57 AMReply

    Didn't Gibson sell the Icon distribution arm a few years ago?

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