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Watch: First Trailer For Woody Allen's 'Magic In The Moonlight' Starring Emma Stone & Colin Firth

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by Kevin Jagernauth
May 21, 2014 2:18 PM
15 Comments
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Magic In The Moonlight

Is it time for Woody Allen to start taking a break between pictures? Yes, his work ethic is admirable but sometimes it feels like he's just going through the motions, and as reliably comforting as his annual movies are, and as thoroughly decent as "Magic In The Moonlight" looks, it's clear he's running through some familiar plot elements.

Emma Stone stars, playing a spiritualist (shades of "You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger," "Alice") who meets her match when a handsome Brit who looks like Colin Firth (Colin Firth) is tasked with trying to debunk her. It's all very frothy and jazzy and picturesque, but when the trailer gets to the scene where our two leads are caught in a rainstorm and run into an observatory, essentially ripping from Allen's classic "Manhattan," we can't help but feel disappointed.

"Magic In The Moonlight" opens on July 25th. Watch below.

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15 Comments

  • Jordan | May 23, 2014 3:47 AMReply

    This looks fantastic to me. I see some elements of Scoop, but the setting it in the past is brilliant and the cast looks terrific.

    It might be time for Kevin Jagernauth to take a break. Even a lesser Woody Allen movie is worth seeing, he's a master. And a Woody Allen period piece is always special.

    And a lot of directors make the same film over and over. That's what they do. Even Scorsese has said several of his films are about protecting his brother.

  • Sandy | May 21, 2014 8:32 PMReply

    This must be Emma's most adorable role. And Colin is so handsome. C'mon! Age is just a number and I'm pretty sure they're gonna have a good chemistry.

  • anonymous | May 21, 2014 8:05 PMReply

    I like Colin Firth and Emma Stone but the age difference is kinda distracting and creepy. He is close to 30 years older than her.

  • Duder NME | May 24, 2014 10:50 AM

    Highly disagreed, Anonymouse. Annie Hall deftly taps into the rarely explored feminine psyche and post-woman's-lib relationships, while Manhattan's myopic focus lay with a small band of pretentious hipsters, passing them off as the zeitgeist of New Yorker life.

    But Love and Death is easily better than either of those.

  • anonymous | May 21, 2014 11:39 PM

    "eh, some people like them older, some like them younger. to each their own, i say, with all respect to legalities and/or cultural norms, unless they involve child brides, that's simply wrong and beyond detestable"

    There are a lot of these relationships in American films, more than in real life and it reeks of old guy wish fulfillment. And a nearly 30 years age difference is pretty extreme imo.

  • Anonymouse | May 21, 2014 8:17 PM

    eh, some people like them older, some like them younger. to each their own, i say, with all respect to legalities and/or cultural norms, unless they involve child brides, that's simply wrong and beyond detestable.

    Manhattan handles this type of age gap deftly and i feel is a much better film than Annie Hall.

  • Glass | May 21, 2014 8:04 PMReply

    I'm beginning to forget what a great Woody Allen film feels like. I'm so used to these Bad/OK/Pretty Good films with a few strong performances, a few good scenes, but lots of stilted dialogue and scenes that don't really work (and nobody else could get away with because their name isn't Woody Allen).

  • Rod | May 21, 2014 3:12 PMReply

    pay no mind to anything jagernauth writes. he's in his bait the reader phase. i simply refuse to believe anyone is as bad at blog copy as he is.

    however, the film appears to be quaint and charming, typical allenesque fair. it really depends on the chemistry of the leads if the film will be any good or not. while Midnight in Paris i found to be delightful, To Rome With Love was dire. Blue Jasmine was a Streetcar Named Desire retread with great acting.

  • TimParker | May 21, 2014 2:44 PMReply

    Also, I have disliked some Woody Allen movies but to suggest that he "take a break" is ridiculous. He's an old man. A "break" is much more like an end. Meaning to sit on a movie until the next year when it's no guarantee he'll be able to make it the next year is to take a big risk. Let's appreciate the fact that every year means a new Woody Allen movie comes out and just accept that not every movie is guaranteed to be one of the greats. Plus, let's remember that this is all subjective and again, that we're watching a trailer, and not the actual movie!!

  • cass | May 21, 2014 2:44 PMReply

    why don't you take a break from making snap judgements attached to trailers? Or a break from countless inane posts about movies that will never happen. Leave Woody alone.

  • Gordon Marshall | May 21, 2014 2:41 PMReply

    Since the person who wrote the snarky comments above HAS NOT SEEN THE MOVIE, as a entertainment reporter writing for an ALLEGEDLY responsible and professional website, he should not be offering an opinion of fhe film. He can review it AFTER he's seen it. People who offer negative comments about movies they haven't seen are the worst kind. Spare us from this drivel.

  • Rip | May 21, 2014 2:30 PMReply

    "where our two leads are caught in a rainstorm and run into an observatory, essentially ripping from Allen's classic 'Annie Hall'" - Bro, seriously?

  • nancy | May 24, 2014 11:07 AM

    He said manhattan. The caught in a rainstorm scene let's duck in here so original.

  • Paul | May 21, 2014 2:25 PMReply

    they ripped the scene off from Manhattan, not Annie Hall

  • TimParker | May 21, 2014 2:35 PM

    Right but wasn't that scene set in a museum, not an observatory?
    The rest of this comment is not @Paul:
    And isn't that also a commonly used scene in all types of movies? It's raining so let's go inside? "Disappointed" seems like a strong reaction, especially considering it's a trailer and not the actual movie. Looking forward to it because it's another Woody Allen movie. Will judge it as it's own movie and will helplessly compare against other Allen movies, but will not try to pre-judge it or pigeonhole into a category of Woody Allen movies

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