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The Playlist

Interview: Director Brad Bird On His $200 Million Live Action Debut 'Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol'

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • December 19, 2011 5:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Judging by the box office numbers, chances are if you lived somewhere with an IMAX theater, you saw "Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol," the fourth and arguably the best (at least since Brian De Palma's) film in the long-running, Tom Cruise-led franchise. And the biggest reason why this movie feels so fresh and new and fizzy is that it's the live action debut of director Brad Bird, who had previously given us genuine animated masterpieces in "The Iron Giant" and (for Pixar) "The Incredibles" and "Ratatouille."

Andrew Stanton Explains 'John Carter' Name Change, Says Girls Won't See A Movie With 'Mars' In The Title

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • December 5, 2011 7:01 PM
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  • 21 Comments
Many fanboys and literary fanatics became ruffled when Disney (and director Andrew Stanton) changed the name of this spring's Edgar Rice Burroughs adaptation "John Carter of Mars" to simply, "John Carter." Apparently Stanton was in London to screen 20 minutes of footage from the hotly anticipated film and during the presentation he explained to assorted journalists (including someone from Bleeding Cool) why it had undergone a surgical title snip. And, well, it's not exactly going to silence those that feel Pixar (which was unofficially involved in "John Carter") is a boys club.

'John Carter' Had A Lengthy 18 Day Reshoot To Improve & Correct Story Issues

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • October 12, 2011 2:19 AM
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  • 7 Comments
Movie Will Need To Make At Least $700 Million To Green Light A Sequel"Reshoots should be mandatory," director Andrew Stanton recently told the New Yorker in an extensive profile. He said this while on the set of his first live action movie "John Carter" during an extensive 18 day reshoot this past April. While the term "reshoot" is generally shorthand used to denote a troubled production, for Stanton, who comes from the world of Pixar where films are storyboarded in full, critiqued, broken down and retooled numerous times before animation even begins, it's a luxury that he feels every production should take advantage of. In the case of Pixar, it may mean a movie takes three or four years to develop, but it also ensures the high quality standard of the studio is maintained. As the profile's writer Tad Friend notes, it's a bit like the old Hollywood studio system where many hands were involved in putting a movie together, and Stanton agrees.

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