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News Corp Media Unit Now Named 21st Century Fox; Movie Studio Sticking to Old Name UPDATE (FANFARE VIDEO)

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood April 18, 2013 at 8:07PM

News Corporation has selected the name 21st Century Fox for its new media and entertainment company, which includes Fox News, Fox Broadcasting and its Hollywood studio. The new company's previous name was Fox Group.
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20th Century Fox logo

News Corporation has selected the name 21st Century Fox for its new media and entertainment company, which includes Fox News, Fox Broadcasting and its Hollywood studio. The new company's previous name was Fox Group.

The name both recalls the film history heritage of 20th Century Fox, while looking ahead to the future, and highlighting the company's creative achievements. In a note, News Corporation chairman and chief Rupert Murdoch praised Fox films like "Avatar" and "Titanic," and TV shows such as "Homeland" and "Modern Family." 

Murdoch will continue to serve as chief of the newly named company. UPDATE: To cheers from exhibitors, Fox chairman Jim Gianopoulos announced that the studio will be hanging on to its own name from here on in. "Twentieth Century Fox all the way," he told TOH after the Fox presentation Thursday.

Below is a fun (if repetitive) visual history of the 20th Century Fox logo, including its early black-and-white "20th Century Pictures" iteration, the CinemaScope label, and the more recent extended logo sequence under News Corporation.

TOH-ers, what are your favorite classic 20th Century Fox films? "Laura," "All About Eve," "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" and "The Sound of Music" come to mind.

This article is related to: News, News, Twentieth Century Fox, 20th Century Fox


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.