Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Top 10 Takeaways: 'Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation' Opens Strong, But Summer 2015 Has Peaked Top 10 Takeaways: 'Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation' Opens Strong, But Summer 2015 Has Peaked Arthouse Audit: Controversy Reigns as 'End of the Tour' Tops Limited Newbies and Weinstein Dumps Jeunet's Latest Arthouse Audit: Controversy Reigns as 'End of the Tour' Tops Limited Newbies and Weinstein Dumps Jeunet's Latest Friday Box Office: Cruise and 'Mission: Impossible' Do Their Part, But Grosses Lag Friday Box Office: Cruise and 'Mission: Impossible' Do Their Part, But Grosses Lag Fall Calendar Reveals Awards Itinerary and Stealth Contenders Fall Calendar Reveals Awards Itinerary and Stealth Contenders Sarajevo Film Fest Lineup Has Auteurs, Cannes Winners and Favorites Sarajevo Film Fest Lineup Has Auteurs, Cannes Winners and Favorites Jason Segel Takes On David Foster Wallace in Controversial 'End of the Tour' (VIDEO) Jason Segel Takes On David Foster Wallace in Controversial 'End of the Tour' (VIDEO) First Look: Cynthia Nixon Plays—and Narrates—Emily Dickinson in Two Films First Look: Cynthia Nixon Plays—and Narrates—Emily Dickinson in Two Films Troubled Western 'Jane Got a Gun' Rescued as Relativity Files for Bankruptcy (Updated) Troubled Western 'Jane Got a Gun' Rescued as Relativity Files for Bankruptcy (Updated) Read Martin Scorsese's Column on His Favorite Hollywood Leading Ladies Read Martin Scorsese's Column on His Favorite Hollywood Leading Ladies A Woman in Charge: Warner Bros. Names Sue Kroll Head of Global Distribution A Woman in Charge: Warner Bros. Names Sue Kroll Head of Global Distribution Netflix and Marvel Shake Up TCAs, Amazon Rescues Bryan Cranston Pilot Netflix and Marvel Shake Up TCAs, Amazon Rescues Bryan Cranston Pilot 'The Witch' Won't Open Until 2016, But Its Sundance-Winning Director Has a New Film 'The Witch' Won't Open Until 2016, But Its Sundance-Winning Director Has a New Film Charles Aidikoff Screening Room Shutters: End of an Era for LA Critics? Charles Aidikoff Screening Room Shutters: End of an Era for LA Critics? How HBO's 'Ballers' Fails Sports Fans How HBO's 'Ballers' Fails Sports Fans Michael Moore Reveals Stealth NSA Project 'Where to Invade Next' on Periscope Michael Moore Reveals Stealth NSA Project 'Where to Invade Next' on Periscope Showtime Chief on David Lynch's 'Twin Peaks' Revival: "It's His Show" Showtime Chief on David Lynch's 'Twin Peaks' Revival: "It's His Show" Toronto Film Festival Lineup: What Did They Get? Toronto Film Festival Lineup: What Did They Get? Discover the Brothers Quay, Identical Twin Animators Who Inspired Christopher Nolan Discover the Brothers Quay, Identical Twin Animators Who Inspired Christopher Nolan Jill Soloway Says "There Is an All Out-Attack" on Female Filmmakers Jill Soloway Says "There Is an All Out-Attack" on Female Filmmakers Why Kevin Costner Paid for 'Black or White' (New Trailer, Sneak Preview Q & A) Why Kevin Costner Paid for 'Black or White' (New Trailer, Sneak Preview Q & A)

EXCLUSIVE: TOKYOPOP's Stu Levy Talks Disaster Doc 'Pray for Japan'

Thompson on Hollywood By Liza Foreman | Thompson on Hollywood March 30, 2012 at 4:11PM

When filmmaker Stu Levy flew from Los Angeles to Tokyo on March 9, 2011, he had no idea that he would return with close-up footage of one of the worst natural disasters in living memory.
0
"Pray for Japan"
"Pray for Japan"

When filmmaker Stu Levy flew from Los Angeles to Tokyo on March 9, 2011, he had no idea that he would return with close-up footage of one of the worst natural disasters in living memory. The resulting Japanese-language documentary, "Pray for Japan," is currently playing in AMC theaters stateside and showed at this week’s Okinawa International Movie Festival.

Levy was heading for Japan to tell his business associates the sad news that he had closed down U.S. operations on TOKYOPOP, his 15-year-old Manga publishing-and-production company. “Borders owed me a lot of money,” he said. “It closed down and I just couldn't pay anyone after that.”

Two days later, the first earthquake struck during a conference call to Australia. Levy kept talking. “I’m from Los Angeles.  I kind of ignored it,” he said. When the second quake hit, it was time to hang up. Everyone huddled indoors.

The filmmaker watched events unfold from the relative safety of his Tokyo TV. But like many in Japan, he had holidayed in the coastal areas where the tsunami hit hardest. "All of a sudden, I was watching it all being swept away," he recalls. "It was unfathomable. But the first thing I thought was that we have to help. So I made contact with my friends and said, 'we have to go.'”

His friends “flaked,” but Levy soon connected with a non-profit and was on his way, he said. “We drove up with gasoline and provisions. There was no idea of a film. There was a lot that touched me about how the people were behaving up there, that special Japanese spirit of helping people out and not being so selfish and 'what about me,' like it is in our part of the world."

He was also shocked by what he saw. “The imagery is something that you can’t ignore,” he said. “These people had lost everything. It was freezing cold. It was worse than camping. There were old photos and debris everywhere and cars in the trees. You couldn’t create a movie set like that. Production managers would say, 'you're faking it, this is too extreme.'”

As word spread of the Fukushima radiation threat, all volunteers were ordered to leave. “The NGO found out from the French Embassy that they were pulling out, and they pulled us out and we had no choice,” he said. “It was so sad. None of us wanted to leave. We felt terrible.”

Back in Tokyo, Levy returned to deal with his production company for a few weeks. But he soon headed back North with an Osaka butcher friend. "We went up with all this meat and did a soup kitchen. That’s when we met a local guy. He said, 'you should make a documentary about this.'”

"Wouldn’t it be rude?" Levy asked him. "He said, 'in this moment helping is urgent, but for the future for our children it is important to remember what happened.'”

A friend offered to match whatever money he put in. When all the cameramen was booked to cover the tragedy, Levy did the camerawork himself. Between filming, he continued to do what he could to help. “I couldn't just stand there and film,” he said.

Levy was moved to see the "real impact on many in the audience" of “Pray for Japan” at the Okinawa Film Festival.

TOKYOPOP is continuing its international operations.

This article is related to: Documentary, Trailers, Festivals, Festivals, Interviews


E-Mail Updates








Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.