Blogroll

Thompson on Hollywood

Casting News: Hendricks in Drive, Renner and Rapace Witch Hunters, Seydoux vs. Bruni in Paris

- Drive just got juicier with Mad Men fixture Christina Hendricks set to join Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston, Oscar Isaacs and Albert Brooks in the Nicolas Winding Refn film, which shifts into gear at the end of this month. Hendrick's role is unidentified, though The Playlist suggests, following a perusal of the "terrific, noirish script," that she must be the female associate of bank-robber-Mulligan's-boyfriend (presumably played by Isaacs).
  • By Sophia Savage
  • |
  • September 9, 2010 12:31 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Telluride Report: Frears' Tamara Drewe, Morris's Tabloid

Telluride Report: Frears' Tamara Drewe, Morris's Tabloid
Meredith Brody reports from the ground in Telluride on Stephen Frears' Tamara Drewe and Errol Morris's doc Tabloid.
  • By Meredith Brody
  • |
  • September 9, 2010 11:48 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments

I'm Still Here Reviews: Fascinating, Hilarious, Genuinely Hated, Nucleus of Truth

It shouldn't need an introduction by now (Variety calls it the "most publicly prominent piece of performance art ever"), but The Playlist provides a useful Idiot's Guide To I'm Still Here (which premiered at Venice and opens Friday) in the intro the their own review: "The 'is this a joke' aspect of the entire affair was perhaps best typified on the much-watched bizarro appearance on the Late Show With David Letterman where the celebrity mumbled meekly throughout and the talk show host mocked Phoenix for barely being mentally present. I'm Still Here is a document of that lost-in-the-wilderness period directed by Phoenix's brother-in-law Casey Affleck in his feature-length debut."
  • By Sophia Savage
  • |
  • September 9, 2010 6:59 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

The Town: Early Reviews

Following its September 8th premiere at the Venice Film Festival, reviews for Ben Affleck's second film (in theatres September 17th) are decidedly mixed, though none (excluding The Guardian's harsh review, after the jump) go so far as to deny it is a worthwhile slice of gritty Boston crime in tune with thematic ancestors sharing its East Coast locale: Mystic River, The Departed and Affleck's 2007 debut, Gone Baby Gone.
  • By Sophia Savage
  • |
  • September 9, 2010 6:12 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments

Exclusive Clip: Never Let Me Go

Exclusive Clip: Never Let Me Go
Pre-Toronto, we're happy to reveal a new, exclusive clip of Never Let Me Go (here's TOH's positive review). Director Mark Romanek and writer Alex Garland's adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro's novel features Carey Mulligan, Keira Knightley and Andrew Garfield as students of Hailsham boarding school, a mysterious institution set in an alternative past in Britain. The three struggle to define their existence and the nature of love after being confronted with a dark destiny.
  • By Cameron Carlson
  • |
  • September 9, 2010 2:59 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment

Telluride Wrap: Best of Fest

One great thing about The Telluride Film Festival: it's all over in four days. So as America gets back to work and school, Tim Appelo wraps up the best of the fest:
  • By Tim Appelo
  • |
  • September 8, 2010 9:06 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments

Fassbender/McQueen Reunite, Studio Critique, Love And Other Drugs, Mulligan Talks Never Let Me Go

- The Guardian calls Hollywood's summer box office victory - approximately a 2.4% lead on 2009 - a hollow one; "the abiding memory of summer 2010 will be of a decline in standards" (the standards of storytelling, not technical effects). The arguments behind this hollow victory include the decline in actual people in theatre seats (lowest since 1997) and the rise in revenue (thanks, 3-D), the root of which conflicts with studios' growing challenge to stay relevant amongst growing sources of alternative entertainment (if they're only making movies for profit, they're undermining the argument for preserving the relevance of film). The Guardian also disses too many studio-approved screenplays that "too often settle for tired storylines, hackneyed dialogue and vacuous characters hiding behind music video sensibilities and loud explosions." The Guardian does see hope in the next year (including Never Let Me Go, but warns another "creatively impoverished" season of films will descend upon us sooner or later.
  • By Sophia Savage
  • |
  • September 8, 2010 7:30 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment

Summer Box Office Wrap: Winners and Losers, from Karate Kid to Cats and Dogs

Summer Box Office Wrap: Winners and Losers, from Karate Kid to Cats and Dogs
In the final analysis the summer box office doesn't look so bad, writes TOH numbers cruncher Anthony D'Alessandro, who insists that weighing cost vs. return is more important than tallying the grosses or admissions.
  • By Anthony D'Alessandro
  • |
  • September 8, 2010 7:14 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Barney's Version in Sony's Hands

Before its launch in Venice and Toronto Fest, Sony Pictures Classics has scooped up Barney's Version. Based on Mordecai Richler's acclaimed comic novel and directed by Richard J. Lewis, the film's stellar cast is led by Paul Giamatti, Minnie Driver, Dustin Hoffman and Rosamund Pike. The story spans three decades of Barney's extraordinary life (although he is an ordinary man), running through three wives, an absurd father and an indulgent best friend.
  • By Anne Thompson
  • |
  • September 8, 2010 6:40 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment

London Film Festival Announces Lineup

From October 13 through 28 the 54th London Film Festival will screen 197 features and 112 shorts hailing from over 67 countries. Mark Romanek's Never Let Me Go will open the fest, and he will be the subject of one of the Screen Talks, along with Darren Aronofsky, whose Black Swan will also screen. Among the seventy American features playing are Derek Cianfrance's Sundance/Cannes holdover Blue Valentine [pictured], Tony Goldwyn's Conviction, Kelly Reichardt's Meek's Cutoff, Aaron Katz's Cold Weather and Danny Boyle's 127 Hours (which will close the festival). The festival is broken into several programs; Gala Screenings (The King's Speech), Film On The Square (Jean-Luc Godard's Film Socialisme and Chad's A Screaming Man), New British Cinema (Gilian Wearing's debut Self Made), French Revolutions (Guillaume Canet's Little White Lies with Marion Cotillard and Lola Doillon's In Your Hands with Kristin Scott Thomas), Cinema Europa (Eva Green in Womb), World Cinema (Michael Rowe's Cannes Camera d'Or winner Leap Year), Treasures From The Archive (Edward Yang's [Scorsese's World Cinema Foundation] A Brighter Summer Day), and Experimenta (Sharon Lockhart's feature Double Tide). On September 28, the fest will announce the award shortlist.
  • By Sophia Savage
  • |
  • September 8, 2010 5:51 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Email Updates