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Apple Multimedia Player, Avatar Rubik's Cube, Wizard of Oz Redux, Banned Words, Online Media News

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood January 5, 2010 at 1:41AM

When I first reported on the Kindle, I thought that it was great for reading books, but fell short when reading journalism content because it was shut off from the internet. Well, that's why everyone is going nuts over the new "iTablet" likely to be unveiled in San Francisco January 27. It will cost about $1000, including subscription to a wi-fi network, reports the WSJ. Shipping of the untitled 10-11 inch touch screen multimedia device could ship in March:
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Thompson on Hollywood

When I first reported on the Kindle, I thought that it was great for reading books, but fell short when reading journalism content because it was shut off from the internet. Well, that's why everyone is going nuts over the new "iTablet" likely to be unveiled in San Francisco January 27. It will cost about $1000, including subscription to a wi-fi network, reports the WSJ. Shipping of the untitled 10-11 inch touch screen multimedia device could ship in March:

The tablet is expected to be a multimedia device that will let people watch movies and television shows, play games, surf the Internet and read electronic books and newspapers. People briefed by Apple also say that the company believes it could redefine the way consumers interact with a variety of content. Textbooks and newspapers, for example, could be presented differently through color screens, a touch interface, and the integration of live up-to-the-minute information from multiple sources.

Ex-LAT online editor Richard Rushfield is leaving Gawker Media after four months to go to another site, Deca, otherwise known as the Entertainment Gateway of America. (Sounds like something Lew Wasserman would create.) Actually the two-year-old site is chock full video and having established some traffic for such video series as Momversation, Parents Ask and Good Bite, Deca's now reaching out to bloggers with expertise to build blogs around them. (Yes, yet another entertainment-related site appears to be in the offing. Just what we need! Isn't the online entertainment space feeling very crowded? Or am I following too many people on Twitter?) And, for those of you who follow American Idol, @richardrushfield threatens to start indulging his obsession on Twitter soon.

For those of you who can't get anough of James Cameron, he talked to Studio 360's Kurt Andersen, who as far as I'm concerned has the world's best job. Avatar "was a big Rubik's cube," Cameron told him. Bonus: Anderson also talks to 2000-year-old men Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks.

Steve Pond tracks down news on who the Academy music branch deems eligible for the Oscar for best original score. Karen O. and Carter Burwell's Where the Wild Things Are score, for example, is out. The Academy has strict rules about originality which dive-bombed Jonny Greenwood's 2007 score for There Will Be Blood. Awards Daily has already posted an Oscar ballot you can start to fill out.

Wired reports on Asylum, home of cheap and schlocky blockbuster rip-offs from Sherlock Holmes to Snakes on a Train.

A list of must-to-avoid words and phrases for the new year, including bromance, tweet, using "friend" as a verb, and "in these economic times."

Screenwriter Josh Olson (A History of Violence) confirms that once upon a time he did pitch a Return to Oz, concept, which has been titillating people on the internet. That doesn't mean it's anywhere near happening.

Mediaite has named two on-line editors of the year: Harvey Levin of TMZ.com and Choire Sicha at The Awl.

This article is related to: Media, Directors, Franchises, Daily Read, James Cameron, Avatar


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Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.