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Books Vs. Films: Which Is Better? (INFOGRAPHIC)

Photo of Ryan Lattanzio By Ryan Lattanzio | TOH! December 31, 2013 at 1:09PM

Lovereading.co.uk has created the infographic "The Ultimate Showdown: Books Vs. Films," a thorough survey of contemporary and classic literary adaptations onscreen. Results were culled from an aggregate of reviews of both books and movies over the last two decades.
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Infographic

Lovereading.co.uk has created the infographic "The Ultimate Showdown: Books vs. Films," a thorough survey of contemporary and classic literary adaptations onscreen. Results were culled from an aggregate of reviews of both books and movies over the last two decades.The clear winner according to the graphic (below)? Books. And the results give a sense of what is gained and lost in translation from page to screen--and which, ultimately, audiences prefer.

While hugely popular books remain more beloved, and prevalent, than their movies, obscure source material made into hit movies is beat out, hence the gap between David Fincher's "The Social Network" and Ben Mezrich's Facebook backstory book "The Accident Billionaires," for example. Meanwhile, love for "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy by JRR Tolkien and Peter Jackson's global blockbusters are roughly neck-and-neck.

2013 has been a banner year for literary and nonfiction adaptations, among them "12 Years a Slave," "The Book Thief," "Labor Day," "The Wolf of Wall Street" and "Long Walk to Freedom," a few of which have landed on the NYT bestsellers list.

Books vs Films


This article is related to: Books, News


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.