Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Cannes 2011: Les Bien-aimés To Close Festival May 22; Tesson to Head Critics Week; Egypt Tribute

Thompson on Hollywood By Anne Thompson and Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood April 28, 2011 at 4:30AM

Cannes 2011's closing night film will be Les Bien-aimés (The Beloved), from director Christophe Honoré. The film will screen out of competition on May 22, following the awards ceremony. Les Bien-aimés stars Catherine Deneuve, Ludivine Sagnier, Chiara Mastroiani, Milos Forman, Louis Garrel, Michel Delpech and Paul Schneider as characters guiding us throughout decades in Prague, London, the "world of Sept. 11," and modern day Paris. Honoré's film Les chansons d’amour premiered at Cannes 2007 (Honoré pictured on set with his actors).
0
Thompson on Hollywood


Cannes 2011's closing night film will be Les Bien-aimés (The Beloved), from director Christophe Honoré. The film will screen out of competition on May 22, following the awards ceremony. Les Bien-aimés stars Catherine Deneuve, Ludivine Sagnier, Chiara Mastroiani, Milos Forman, Louis Garrel, Michel Delpech and Paul Schneider as characters guiding us throughout decades in Prague, London, the "world of Sept. 11," and modern day Paris. Honoré's film Les chansons d’amour premiered at Cannes 2007 (Honoré pictured on set with his actors).

Thompson on Hollywood

Here is a synopsis via IOnCinema:

Scripted by Honoré, this romantic comedy takes place over two time periods. In the first, during the 1960s, Madeleine leaves Paris to join her new husband Jaromil in Prague. The arrival of Russian tanks in the city marks their separation and Madeleine returns to France. In the second, in the 90s, Madeleine’s daughter Véra falls in love in London with Henderson, who feels unable of loving her. Madeleine and Véra each play out their feminine roles at the end of the 20th century, albeit with slight stubbornness, without which they would simply give in.

French film critic, author and ex-Cahiers du Cinema editor Charles Tesson has been named to take over Cannes' Critics' Week from Jean-Christophe Berjon, beginning a three year term next year. He has published books on auteurs Luis Bunuel, Akira Kurosawa and Abbas Kiarostami.

Cannes has chosen Egypt as its first ever guest country, and will celebrate the country's cultural reform and cinema history. There will be a screening of 18 Days, which was shoot by ten filmmakers following the Egypt's revolution on January 25, 2011, and combines stories "witnessed, heard or imagined" by its makers. Hussein Kamal's The Postman (1968) and Abdel Aziz's Le Cri d'une fourmi will also screen. Cannes also announces that Gulf oil spill doc The Big Fix, from director Josh Tickell and producer Peter Fonda, and Tunisian revolution doc Plus jamais peur, from Mourad Ben Cheikh, will also screen at the festival.

[Picture: ToutleCine]

This article is related to: Directors, Festivals, Cannes


E-Mail Updates