Tom Hanks in "Captain Phillips"
Tom Hanks in "Captain Phillips"

By contrast, "Captain Phillips" renders the inaccessible immediate: Greengrass, a skillful hand when it comes to docudrama ("Bloody Sunday," "United 93"), revels in realism's jostle, even if it means sometimes crowding out the mundane aspects of the real. Based on the captain's reminiscences, the film follows Richard Phillips (Tom Hanks) through the fretful hours of the Maersk Alabama's 2009 hijacking in a near-constant state of tension -- it left me wrung out like a tattered rag, weak-kneed from the excitement. It may also be something of a fabrication. (Slate's Forrest Wickman has an extensive analysis of the film's accuracy here.)

In the final estimation, each film deserves the other -- the whole that emerges from their two halves lends "Captain Phillips" context and "Stolen Seas" texture. The experience of each is better for the other's existence. Ishmael Ali proclaims himself a businessman and acknowledges that "piracy feeds a lot of people"; "Captain Phillips" shows young Somali men clamoring for space on the hijackers' boat and culminates in a series of stricken cries, as profoundly emotional as anything I saw at the movies this year. I cannot exactly pinpoint the truth of the matter in either case, but that's merely a way of saying that one man's imprecision is another's joy. 

"Captain Phillips" is playing in theaters nationwide. "Stolen Seas" is now available on VOD. Read TOH! contributor Bill Desowitz's "Immersed in Movies" column on "Captain Phillips," Dana Brunetti and Michael de Luca's comments on the controversy surrounding the film, and Tom Hanks' interview at the London Film Festival.