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Thompson on Hollywood

'The Hobbit' Takes the Safe Route: 24 FPS Goes Wide, 48 FPS Goes Limited

Peter Jackson's "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" was supposed to lead the 48 fps revolution in the film industry, but now it looks like its debut will be more whimper than bang. After the film's 48 fps footage received mixed reactions at CinemaCon, and the filmmaker took the safe route at Comic-Con by screening "The Hobbit" footage at only 24 fps, Warner Bros. has opted to give the increased frame-per-second "Hobbit" a limited release on December 14, with the standard frame rate version releasing wide.
  • By Beth Hanna
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  • August 8, 2012 1:43 PM
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Obit: New York Film Critic Judith Crist

Judith Crist, the tough, witty, and often caustic film critic who combined a passionate love for movies with an equally passionate distaste for movie rubbish, died Tuesday, August 7 at the age of 90.  According to her son, Steven Crist, she died at her Manhattan home after a long illness. Director Billy Wilder once remarked that inviting Crist to review one of your films was “like asking the Boston Strangler for a neck massage.” And Wilder was one of her favorites. She was arguably the most powerful film critic of her era because of her two-prong status as main reviewer at both the New York Herald Tribune and NBC’s “Today” show.
  • By Aljean Harmetz
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  • August 7, 2012 9:06 PM
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  • 1 Comment
More: Critics, Obit

Obit: 'Chorus Line' Composer Marvin Hamlisch Wrote for Film, Theater and TV --and Streisand

Marvin Hamlisch, a composer who moved effortlessly from movies to musical theatre to television, winning Grammys, Emmys, Oscars and a Tony award, died unexpectedly on Monday, August 6, at the age of 68 after a brief illness. Hamlisch and Richard Rodgers are the only two composers who have won all of those awards as well as a Pulitzer Prize. As the composer of “A Chorus Line,” Hamlisch shared the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1976.
  • By Aljean Harmetz
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  • August 7, 2012 7:57 PM
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  • 1 Comment
More: Obit

First Look at J.C. Chandor's 'All is Lost' with Robert Redford

J. C. Chandor, who won the Indie Spirit Award for Best First Feature for Lionsgate/Roadside's "Margin Call," has wrapped principal photography on his sophomore feature, "All is Lost." The film stars Robert Redford as a man lost at sea who battles the elements to stay alive. Chandor also penned the screenplay, as he did for Oscar-nominated "Margin Call."
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • August 7, 2012 3:16 PM
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  • 0 Comments

Toronto Preview: New Images for 'Anna Karenina'; 'Les Miz' Won't Make Fall Fests

Working Title, Keira Knightley and Joe Wright have done well together so far with the period Oscar contenders "Pride & Prejudice" and "Atonement." But the director and star don't always do as well apart with more contemporary material--see Knightley's "London Boulevard" or "Seeking a Friend for the End of the World" or Wright's "Hanna" or "The Soloist." We will see if Wright and Working Title's "Anna Karenina," adapted by Tom Stoppard from Leo Tolstoy's Russian classic, will help Knightley recover from recent reviews with a second Oscar nomination (after "Pride & Prejudice"). After all, what better role to play than Karenina, passionately in love with a dashing officer ("Kick-Ass" star Aaron Johnson) as her husband (Jude Law) battles for control and society looks on.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • August 7, 2012 3:02 PM
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  • 1 Comment

Busy Jennifer Lawrence Balances Franchise Paydays with Indie Fare; Wanted for 'Ends of the Earth'

With both David O. Russell's "Silver Linings Playbook" (November 21) and Suzanne Bier's "Serena" (2013) in the bag, Jennifer Lawrence is a lock for two "Hunger Games" sequels (going from $500,000 to some $10-million for number two) and a reprise of her role as Mystique in an "X-Men: First Class" sequel, but her future indie pursuits are less certain.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • August 7, 2012 1:35 PM
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Daniel Day-Lewis is the Embodiment of 'Lincoln'; Spielberg Talks Character with EW

Who else but Daniel Day-Lewis could embody Abraham Lincoln so well? Day-Lewis is known for his startling characterizations and method process, from "My Left Foot" and "The Last of the Mohicans" to "Gangs of New York" and "There Will Be Blood," and we should expect no less from his portrayal of President Lincoln in Steven Spielberg's biopic. But, the director clarifies, “Daniel never went into a fugue state" for "Lincoln"; he was always aware of his contemporary surroundings, but was referred to as Mr. President on set. With very little to go by, Day-Lewis's track record (four Oscar noms, two wins) makes it safe to assume his performance will be central in the Awards race.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • August 7, 2012 1:30 PM
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  • 3 Comments

Posters for PT Anderson's 'The Master' Play with Perception

Two posters for Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master" have recently landed. Both are brilliant. Which is your favorite? If you can't wait until September 14 for more, Beth Hanna reviewed the film at its surprise Aero Theater screening last weekend.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • August 7, 2012 1:29 PM
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Tribeca Announces 2013 Festival Dates, Call for Submissions; New Transmedia Program

The Tribeca Film Festival's twelfth edition will be held in New York City from April 17-28, 2013. The festival also reveals submission dates for narrative and documentary features as well as short films (below).
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • August 7, 2012 1:29 PM
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Drafthouse Acquires 'Rubber' Director's Next, Surreal Sundance Entry 'Wrong'

Alamo Drafthouse distribution label Drafthouse Films has acquired North American rights to Quentin Dupieux's surreal Sundance entry "Wrong."
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • August 7, 2012 11:12 AM
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  • 0 Comments

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