Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Blogroll

Thompson on Hollywood

SFIFF Review: World Premiere of Terrorist-Savvy 'Informant'

"Informant" has timing on its side. The documentary by Jamie Meltzer, told mostly in the voice of Brandon Darby, is an activist’s journey from the post-Katrina ruins of New Orleans, to Venezuela and Colombia, and back the United States, where Darby sours on his former comrades and ends up working for the FBI.
  • By David D'Arcy
  • |
  • April 23, 2012 4:02 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Premiere at Tribeca, Sell at Cannes – The Israeli Solution?

In Tribeca 2012 there are three Israeli features, considered by critics who saw them in pre-festival screenings to be among the best in Tribeca’s offerings this year. They are "Yossi," by Eytan Fox; "Room 514," a first film by Sharon Bar-Ziv, shot in one room; and "The Flat," Arnon Goldfinger's documentary.
  • By David D'Arcy
  • |
  • April 23, 2012 1:03 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Tribeca Fest Review: 'Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story' Takes Us Back to 1960s South

“Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story” is a tragic tale about a black Mississippian who lost his life after television gave him 15 minutes of fame. The doc is also a micro-history of the dark days of the segregationist South, as seen through the life and death of a man who’s described as an accidental activist.
  • By David D'Arcy
  • |
  • April 23, 2012 12:51 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

'Mad Men' Episode 6 Review and Recap: 'Far Away Places' and Wrinkles in Time

In Sunday's all-new "Mad Men" episode, the blissful promise of escape tempts Don, Peggy and Roger. Yet time is a prison -- and keeps us guessing.
  • By Beth Hanna
  • |
  • April 23, 2012 5:42 AM
  • |
  • 6 Comments

SFIFF 55 Reviews: 'Goodbye,' 'Robot & Frank,' 'How to Survive a Plague,' 'Fourth Dimension'

Only two films into the day and I’ve already been confronted with political repression, abuse, Down syndrome, and Alzheimer’s. I go to see “The Fourth Dimension,” a trilogy of films created around a set of instructions that sound Dogme-esque but more specific (stuffed animals and bad jokes must be included) by Harmony Korine...
  • By Meredith Brody
  • |
  • April 22, 2012 3:52 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments

Tribeca Film Festival Review: Familiar Thriller 'Replicas' Boasts Strong Leads

If you’re out in the woods in a mansion, don’t open the door to strangers. If you do, and you happen to be in a movie, prepare to be at the wrong end of a shotgun.
  • By David D'Arcy
  • |
  • April 22, 2012 3:07 PM
  • |
  • 3 Comments

Tribeca Film Festival Review: Alex Karpovsky's 'Rubberneck' Channels Hitchcock and Chabrol

Writer/director/actor Alex Karpovsky is a presence out there for the younger indie public – a bit Woody Allen, a bit of a geek from his own generation, with a sinister side as a pathetic, intelligent but volatile loser at love in the low-budget “Rubberneck,” which made its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival.
  • By David D'Arcy
  • |
  • April 22, 2012 2:53 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment

SFIFF Review: Peter Nicks' Doc 'The Waiting Room'

"The Waiting Room" is edited to give the range of emotions observed and experienced in that space, and that range is vast. This is documentary as distilled observation. It’s also as strong an argument for universal health care that I’ve seen in years.
  • By David D'Arcy
  • |
  • April 22, 2012 1:41 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

55th San Francisco International Film Festival Gets Under Way: 'Farewell My Queen,' 'Trishna,' 'Twixt'

Among the fiction films, famed auteurs are not in abundance, having seen the Coppola, Winterbottom, and Johnie To films: the new Kassovitz and Guedigian appeal to the Francophile in me, but those are not exactly marquee names. Star power seemed reserved for the tributes to Judy Davis and Kenneth Branagh, but even those names are somewhat subdued in celebrity culture terms.
  • By Meredith Brody
  • |
  • April 21, 2012 12:15 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

SFIFF Review: 'Tokyo Waka: A City Poem'

Would someone please summon Alfred Hitchcock? "Tokyo Waka; A City Poem" is, among other things, an ode to the crows that seem everywhere in that Japanese city. They attack people, they eat anything available, and they raid the city’s zoo to steal baby prairie dogs and other small animals that they can carry away.
  • By David D'Arcy
  • |
  • April 20, 2012 3:38 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Email Updates