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Thompson on Hollywood

Review and Recap -- 'Luck' Episode Three: Back to the Races

Few people have written as well about the track as Bill Barich, whose first book, "Laughing in the Hills," became an instant classic, mainly because it was about the people of the track rather than the horses.
  • By Terry Curtis Fox
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  • February 14, 2012 10:22 AM
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  • 2 Comments

Berlin Fest Reviews: From Period Opener 'Farewell My Queen' to Demented Nazis on the Moon

The Berlin Film Festival got off to a more than respectable start with “Farewell My Queen,” Benoit Jacquot’s smart, elegantly mounted costume drama about the court of Versailles as it’s about to be swept away by the French revolution.
  • By Matt Mueller
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  • February 13, 2012 4:14 PM
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  • 0 Comments

Now and Then: Dunham's 'Tiny Furniture' Bodes Well for HBO's 'Girls'

Lena Dunham in her sophomore feature, "Tiny Furniture"
Midway through "Tiny Furniture," writer-director-star Lena Dunham launches into a monologue — a tantrum, really — that smacks of a tin ear. The plaintive wails seem ginned up for "dramatic effect," though the real effect is to undercut the film's poignant understanding of how scary "coming-of-age" sounds to those going through it.
  • By Matt Brennan
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  • February 13, 2012 10:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment

'Walking Dead' Review: Second Season Starter 'Nebraska'

The new mini-season of "Walking Dead' picks up right where the last left off – with Rick (Andrew Lincoln) having just killed the zombified Sophia (Madison Lintz).
  • By Terry Curtis Fox
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  • February 13, 2012 1:00 AM
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  • 6 Comments
More: Reviews, Reviews, TV

Now and Then: 'The Getaway' and 'Drive' — Heist Films with Arthouse Roots

To call "The Getaway" (1972) a heist flick is like calling "Jaws" a film about fish: technically speaking you'd be right, but you'd also be missing the point entirely. Sam Peckinpah's Steve McQueen/Ali MacGraw vehicle is a tough, mean, innovative picture in which "getting away" has to do with a lot more than not getting arrested.
  • By Matt Brennan
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  • February 6, 2012 1:40 PM
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  • 2 Comments

'Luck' Episode Two: Dustin Hoffman Is Still Trying to Get Traction

Does it say something very good about television or something very bad about movies that Dustin Hoffman is appearing in (and producing) “Luck”?
  • By Terry Curtis Fox
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  • February 5, 2012 11:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
More: Reviews, Reviews, TV, HBO

Now and Then: Making Sense of Miranda July

I am not a Miranda July hater. "Me and You and Everyone We Know" (2005) felt almost painfully fresh to me — I'd never seen anything like it. It had, in offbeat colors and patterns, a preternatural understanding that love and sex vibrate on wavelengths we can't quite see or hear, only sense.
  • By Matt Brennan
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  • January 30, 2012 12:46 PM
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  • 1 Comment

Review: HBO, David Milch and Michael Mann's 'Luck' Pilot Promises More than It Delivers

"Luck" is a world that David Milch knows well. His self-described addiction to the track is legendary, both as a prodigious better and an owner. He once had a horse headed for the Derby who, like a horse in the pilot, broke down (in life, after the Louisville plane tickets had been booked).
  • By Terry Curtis Fox
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  • January 29, 2012 5:53 PM
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  • 2 Comments

Does Oscar Really Follow the Critics? Tell-All Charts

Every year, the lead-up to the Oscars is rife with horse race terminology: there are front-runners, films that lag behind and, of course, last minute surges.  As Hollywood bounces from award ceremony to award ceremony, from SAG to the Golden Globes to the Guild awards, the Oscar-predicting crowd gazes into its collective crystal ball and makes its pronouncements. Taking the cue from one of this year's Oscar contenders (that'd be "Moneyball"), we here at TOH decided to take a closer look at the data to see just how Oscar actually takes his cue from the other awards shows and, most importantly, the critics.
  • By Anne Thompson and Jacob Combs
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  • January 27, 2012 6:46 PM
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  • 6 Comments

Now and Then: In Political Films, Reality Trumps Fiction

"The Ides of March," George Clooney's latest directorial effort, promises by its very title a mixture of danger, betrayal, and warped power. What we get, though, is more disquisition than thrill ride, a technically sound but ultimately unfeeling film about the cynicism of modern politics.
  • By Matt Brennan
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  • January 23, 2012 4:39 PM
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  • 0 Comments

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