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'Catfish' Duo Joost & Schulman Tackle 'Monkey Wrench Gang' Adaptation with 'Bona Fide Stupidity'

Thompson on Hollywood By Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood May 7, 2012 at 4:50PM

"The Monkey Wrench Gang," an adaptation of the 1975 Edward Abbey novel, will be written and directed by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman (the pair behind "Catfish," "Paranormal Activity 3" and the upcoming "Paranormal Activity 4"). Edward Pressman will produce with Gary Burden. Pressman says the pair's take on the material will "connect to the humor and cultural zeitgeist of today in the same way Abbey’s book does."
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Joost & Schulman

"The Monkey Wrench Gang," an adaptation of the 1975 Edward Abbey novel, will be written and directed by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman (the pair behind "Catfish," "Paranormal Activity 3" and the upcoming "Paranormal Activity 4"). Edward Pressman will produce with Gary Burden.

Pressman says the pair's take on the material will "connect to the humor and cultural zeitgeist of today in the same way Abbey’s book does."

“People often ask us why we work together," say Joost and Schulman, "and as Edward Abbey used to say, ‘one man alone can be pretty dumb sometimes, but for real bona fide stupidity, there ain’t nothin’ can beat teamwork.’”

Synopsis below:

Abbey’s bestseller follows the comedic adventure of four lively characters as they battle over-development in the American West in the 1970s. As the law closes in on them, the gang works together as a driven, but sometimes disorganized and bumbling group of amateur saboteurs, attacking deserted bulldozers, construction equipment, and trains, but committed to destroying no life in the process (whether human, animal, plant, or rock). The exception is Hayduke, a young Vietnam Vet, who wants to blow up everything.

This article is related to: IN THE WORKS, News, News, Directors, Genres, Paranormal Activity, Catfish


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.