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Cowboys and Gangsters: Konrad Hits Network Television with 60s Procedural 'Vegas,' Starring Dennis Quaid

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood September 25, 2012 at 2:46PM

Like many other Hollywood heavyweights these days, producer Cathy Konrad ("Girl Interrupted," "Walk the Line," "3:10 to Yuma") has turned from movies to television. It's instructive how her new well-reviewed series "Vegas," which debuts at 10 PM Tuesday September 25, wound up on CBS.
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Dennis Quaid in "Vegas'
Dennis Quaid in "Vegas'

Like many other Hollywood heavyweights these days, producer Cathy Konrad ("Girl Interrupted," "Walk the Line," "3:10 to Yuma") has turned from movies to television. It's instructive how her new well-reviewed series "Vegas," which debuts at 10 PM Tuesday September 25, wound up on CBS.

It makes sense that, having spent her career producing character-driven dramas (a genre Hollywood has largely abandoned), Konrad should take this material to television. Writer Nicholas Pileggi was trying to make a feature film for seven years before WME brought the project to Konrad. But the market had "bottomed out," she says matter-of-factly. "Cobbling together a movie takes such energy and effort, and marketing it is so hard. The math doesn't work on small films. The odds are too slim. We want audiences to see what we're making. It's too hard to compete against the giant tentpole movies."

James Mangold and Cathy Konrad
James Mangold and Cathy Konrad

Gone are the days when companies like Miramax supported indie producers through thick and thin, allowing them to take chances. Konrad still remembers writing checks to the tune of $500,000 to cover the New Mexico prep on western "3:10 to Yuma" (released by Lionsgate) before Relativity came through with bridge loan financing. "The crew hung in there not getting paid through the first week of shooting," she recalls. "If we hadn't started we'd have lost Russell Crowe. If we had paused the movie never would have gotten made."

"Vegas," Konrad decided, "had a better shot as a TV show," she says. "It's where the best character stories are being told."

As soon as Konrad read the first page of Pileggi's scriptment based on the true story of 60s Las Vegas rancher sheriff Ralph Lamb (now 82), she saw the iconic western image of a cowboy on a horse grazing his herd under a clear blue sky --as a DC 6 roars low overhead, heading toward 1960s Las Vegas. She could visualize an entry into the beginnings of a familiar universe, as Fremont Street turns into the Strip, the east coast meets the west coast, and gangsters' self-interest collide with a tough western sheriff. "It was a rich stew," she says. "As a movie Nick couldn't crack it. There was so much life to fit into a two hour movie. He couldn't break it down."

Konrad, a fan of "Damages," "Breaking Bad" and the popular CBS series "The Good Wife," took the project to CBS president Nina Tassler, who bit immediately. That's because, post-"Oceans 11" and "Mad Men," this early 60s Vegas procedural is inherently commercial, and will play to the older CBS crowd. And it easily attracted the likes of real-life rancher Dennis Quaid, returning to TV for the first time since "Baretta" in the 70s, facing off against casino mobster Michael Chiklis ("The Shield"). Carrie-Anne Moss ("The Matrix") is the tough assistant district attorney who returns home to Las Vegas after taking her shot in the Big Apple. Jason O'Mara ("The Closer") plays Ralph's brother Jack.

"The Defenders" and "Without a Trace" showrunner Greg Walker knows his way around police procedurals. And Konrad, who has collaborated with her husband James Mangold in the past, persuaded him, as he was prepping a "Wolverine" installment, to direct the pilot and work with deep researcher Pileggi to create the series Bible. "Feature directors like doing pilots or finales to flex their muscles," she says.

This article is related to: Television, Interviews


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