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Get Low Producer Zanuck: Confessions of a Hollywood Scion

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood August 9, 2010 at 6:49AM

Get Low producer Dean Zanuck was raised by top Hollywood producer Richard Zanuck (Alice in Wonderland, Driving Miss Daisy), who was in turn the son of mighty Twentieth Century Fox mogul Darryl F. Zanuck. So it's not a huge surprise that young Zanuck should wind up in the family business. Happily, so far his genes and upbringing seem to be yielding good taste, from Road to Perdition to Get Low, which took eight long years to get made--even with the great Robert Duvall attached. Sony Pictures Classics acquired the $7-million indie at last year's Toronto Film Festival.
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Thompson on Hollywood

Get Low producer Dean Zanuck was raised by top Hollywood producer Richard Zanuck (Alice in Wonderland, Driving Miss Daisy), who was in turn the son of mighty Twentieth Century Fox mogul Darryl F. Zanuck. So it's not a huge surprise that young Zanuck should wind up in the family business. Happily, so far his genes and upbringing seem to be yielding good taste, from Road to Perdition to Get Low, which took eight long years to get made--even with the great Robert Duvall attached. Sony Pictures Classics acquired the $7-million indie at last year's Toronto Film Festival.

Zanuck talks about the ins and outs of that process, and what his father taught him, in a four-part interview.

Part One, finding Duvall and director Aaron Schneider:

Part Two, working with Bill Murray:

Part Three, growing up in Hollywood:

Part Four, culmination:

Part Five, the high and low of making movies:

This article is related to: Independents, Studios, Video, Sony/Screen Gems/Sony Pictures Classics, Interviews


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.