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Thompson on Hollywood

Harper's Bazaar Celebrates Iconic Scorsese Movie Scenes, New Casts: Taxi Driver, Goodfellas, Gangs

Harper's Bazaar celebrates Martin Scorsese by recasting and photographing some of his most memorable scenes, and talking with his collaborators. Here's a taste.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • October 13, 2011 12:30 PM
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  • 1 Comment

NYFF Early Reviews for 3-D Hugo: Cinephiles Are Delighted by Scorsese's Love Letter to Film

NYFF Early Reviews for 3-D Hugo: Cinephiles Are Delighted by Scorsese's Love Letter to Film
The reason that Paramount screened Martin Scorsese’s work-in-progress 3-D Hugo as the New York Film Festival's Monday night’s mystery screening, without completed effects or a final score (by Howard Shore) is that it’s a cinephile’s dream. The NYFF audience couldn’t have been a more receptive crowd.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • October 11, 2011 4:36 AM
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  • 1 Comment

My Week in New York: Hugo, War Horse, Turin Horse, Parties, Marilyn, Book of Mormon

Monday night's mystery screening of Martin Scorsese's work-in-progress 3-D Hugo (featurette below) marks my last screening at this year's New York Film Festival. The reason that the movie was shown without completed effects or a final score (by Howard Shore) is that it's a cinephile's dream, and the NYFF audience couldn't have been a more receptive crowd. While the movie should work with families over the Thanksgiving holiday, and producer Graham King (nervously pacing in the rear of the theater as ushers passed out 3-D glasses) assured me that they wouldn't have shown the film if the movie wasn't going to finish on time, Paramount wanted to build buzz for the film via the festival and this was the only way to do it.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • October 11, 2011 4:22 AM
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  • 0 Comments

And the Nobel Prize for Film Goes To...

And the Nobel Prize for Film Goes To...
Seeing that the Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded last week, to Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer, Matt Brennan got to thinking: What if there were a Nobel Prize for Film? This week’s “Now and Then” column revels in some of the possibilities. Check out the trailers and post your own picks in the comments section below:
  • By Matt Brennan
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  • October 10, 2011 5:07 AM
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  • 1 Comment

George Harrison: Living in the Material World Reviews: Still Hidden, Enigmatic, Quiet

George Harrison: Living in the Material World Reviews: Still Hidden, Enigmatic, Quiet
Like many boomers, I am a Beatles fan. I can sing every song on Beatles Rock Band, and grew up loving each Beatle in his own way: Paul's narcissistic sweet tenor, John's growly, witty edge, Ringo's underappreciated backbeat and soulful George. He was the gifted musician, the lead guitarist: he made the songs work. And his songs, in my view, stand the test of time along with the best of the Lennon/McCartney songbook, from Harrison's only chart-topper, Something in the Way She Moves to While My Guitar Gently Weeps, featuring rare guest soloist Eric Clapton. While Harrison had fewer compositions, he put more time into them; they pop.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • October 5, 2011 11:28 AM
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  • 1 Comment

Coen Brothers Join TV Migration with Detective Comedy

Everybody's going to TV. Even Joel and Ethan Coen have sold an hour-long private detective comedy to Fox, HarveKarbo. With Cedar Rapids writer Phil Johnston on the script, the brothers' single-camera show will trace the life of P.I. Harve Karbo and his noir-like investigations into the seedy underbelly of Hollywood high society. The Coens, along with Johnston, Imagine co-founder Brian Grazer and president Francie Calfo, will executive produce, reports Deadline.
  • By Anne Thompson and Maggie Lange
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  • October 5, 2011 4:16 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Oscar Powers Netflix's Top Ten Most-Rented List

Oscar Powers Netflix's Top Ten Most-Rented List
Netflix's ten most-rented list of all time (list below) reminds us of the long-tail Power of Oscar. And it should remind Netflix, as it splits its DVD and streaming business and alienates many of its customers who are used to relying on its deep long-tail arcania, that their solid customer base is smart adults, not the great unwashed, something they seem to be in danger of forgetting as they focus on TV and mainstream acquisitions and let smaller movies go.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • October 3, 2011 11:09 AM
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  • 4 Comments

Boardwalk Empire Season 2 Review - Nucky Nosferatu

Boardwalk Empire Season 2 Review - Nucky Nosferatu
As its second season begins, David Chute finds that he admires Boardwalk Empire but does not love it.We took it as a sign during Boardwalk Empire’s first season that the show’s fabulously expensive exterior and interior sets never felt lived in. Compare Boardwalk’s boardwalk, a beautiful sweep of CG-enhanced Hollywood carpentry, with Deadwood’s Deadwood, an assortment of tents and swaybacked outhouses, awash in mud and dust and struggling humanity. Even the Harlan County, Kentucky, of Justified, cobbled together from various locations in Southern California, conveys a more organic sense of place. The characters are convinced that they were born and raised and rooted there, and so do we.
  • By David Chute
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  • September 27, 2011 3:50 AM
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  • 5 Comments

Geeking Out with Cameron at the 3D Summit: Titanic, Avatar, Theme Parks

This week, in his Immersed in Movies column, Bill Desowitz talks to James Cameron at the 3D Summit. Don't try to convince James Cameron that 3-D is faltering. He's still a true believer, despite some recent 3-D blowback. He laughed if off as growing pains and negative media spin at the 3D Entertainment Summit this week at the Hollywood & Highland Center, but said it's nothing that can't be fixed with a change of perception and better 3-D authoring and presentation.
  • By Bill Desowitz
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  • September 23, 2011 5:14 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Toronto Wrap: Best of Fest, Oscar Boosts, Winners and Losers

Toronto Wrap: Best of Fest, Oscar Boosts, Winners and Losers
The trick with the fall film festivals is to gauge expectations going in vs. what was actually achieved. Various distributors launched their fall slates, and watched with pleasure or horror at how their movies were received by audiences and critics. Oscar contenders either moved forward in the awards race, or were pushed back. Other indies hoped their films would be picked up by the right distributor in time for this year's Oscar race. Some were, some weren't. It's tough for films that have already debuted at other festivals to pick up new momentum, although the press will bank features for release. The biggest noise goes to the new players, always.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • September 21, 2011 7:04 AM
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  • 2 Comments

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