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Disney's Mysterious '1952' Clooney Project Entitled 'Tomorrowland'

Thompson on Hollywood By Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood January 30, 2013 at 12:15PM

Disney's top secret project, known as "1952" while in development, has been given an official title: "Tomorrowland." George Clooney is on board to star. The story was developed by director Brad Bird, Damon Lindelof and EW writer Jeff Jensen. Bird and Lindelof wrote the screenplay. Rumors have swirled about the film's subject. Is "1952" the working title for the upcoming "Star Wars: Episode VII"? Or perhaps about the founding of Disney's Imagineering division in 1952?
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Tomorrowland
The photo, via EW

Disney's top secret project, known as "1952" while in development, has been given an official title: "Tomorrowland." George Clooney is on board to star. The story was developed by director Brad Bird, Damon Lindelof and EW writer Jeff Jensen. Bird and Lindelof wrote the screenplay. Rumors have swirled about the film's subject. Is "1952" the working title for the upcoming "Star Wars: Episode VII"? Or perhaps about the founding of Disney's Imagineering division in 1952?

Bird and Lindelof revealed some information via Twitter last week, posting photos of an archive box labeled "1952," but they'll likely keep as much mystery alive as long as possible.

EW explains,

"Inside the box, which supposedly provided inspiration for the story, is a copy of the book Model Research: The National Advisory Committee For Aeronautics 1918-1958 by military history professor Alex Roland (published in 1985), and an August 1928 edition of Amazing Stories magazine, featuring a man in a flying suit on the cover — the first appearance of the time-leaping hero Buck Rogers."

This article is related to: Walt Disney, Disney , George Clooney, News, News


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.