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Emmy Watch: Flying Under Awards Radar, 'Mad Men' Still Soars

Photo of Matt Brennan By Matt Brennan | Thompson on Hollywood! August 19, 2014 at 6:18AM

As the final season of "Mad Men" begins, freelancer Freddy Rumsen (Joel Murray) speeds through a sleek, cinematic pitch for Accutron watches, selling the fantasy of time harnessed, exploited, made beautiful. He's selling, in a sense, "Mad Men" itself. "It's not a timepiece," his tagline goes. "It's a conversation piece."
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Jon Hamm in "Mad Men"
Jon Hamm in "Mad Men"

As the final season of "Mad Men" begins, freelancer Freddy Rumsen (Joel Murray) speeds through a sleek, cinematic pitch for Accutron watches, selling the fantasy of time harnessed, exploited, made beautiful. He's selling, in a sense, "Mad Men" itself. "It's not a timepiece," his tagline goes. "It's a conversation piece."

Of course, AMC's stalwart drama is a timepiece, long defined by its sumptuous period detail and glancing relationship with the real-life history of the Sixties. But "Mad Men" has always been in conversation with that history, committed to the notion that "culture" not only responds to changing times but also actively shapes how we live and subsequently remember them. Freddy delivers his presentation of the Accutron campaign, devised by Don Draper (Jon Hamm), directly into the camera, his question making us complicit in the conversation. "Are you ready?"

This is the enduring appeal of "Mad Men," a series whose historical accuracy -- or lack thereof, when it comes to the complexities of race relations -- has always been its weakest selling point. "Mad Men" cautions that the ways we confront the passage of time, whether as nostalgia for the past or dreams of the future, are sometimes a bill of goods, and we're the ones doing the buying.

The first half of the series' bifurcated seventh season, "The Beginning," received eight Emmy nominations, but "Mad Men" nonetheless appears to be flying under the radar. TOH! predicts another AMC flagship, "Breaking Bad," to trump "Mad Men" in three major categories: Drama, Lead Actor (Bryan Cranston vs. Hamm) and Supporting Actress (Anna Gunn vs. Christina Hendricks).

The excellence of "Breaking Bad" aside, the lack of Emmy buzz for the four-time Best Drama winner is tough to pin down. It may not be the shortened season, per se (cable series of similar length are ascendant), but the new structure appears to have done "Mad Men" few favors. Creator Matthew Weiner has long preferred to arrange each character's arc gradually, such that the first handful of episodes seem to point in no particular direction, only to pull the threads taut at the end of the season to reveal a cohesive whole. But five episodes into "The Beginning," even I began to wonder if Weiner had left himself enough space to stick the landing, and Emmy voters lost in the halting narrative may well have moved on to more urgent material.

If this explains why "Mad Men" is unlikely to score many victories this year -- sentimental favorite Robert Morse, in his farewell appearance as Bert Cooper, already lost out to Joe Morton of "Scandal" for Guest Actor -- that's too bad. The final two episodes count among the series' best, beautifully illustrating the "Mad Men" ethos. Taken together, "The Strategy" and "Waterloo" assert a powerful argument that mass culture is, as Don says about Hershey's in the season-six finale, "the currency of affection."

This article is related to: Emmys, Mad Men, Breaking Bad, Genres, Drama, Awards, Jon Hamm, Elisabeth Moss, Christina Hendricks, Matthew Weiner


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.