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EW's Top Five All-Time Greatest Films, TV Shows and More -- Do We Need More Lists?

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood June 27, 2013 at 1:47PM

Entertainment Weekly's upcoming edition (on newsstands June 28) is being trumpeted as their first All-Time Greatest issue. This means lists galore. The sneak peek they've sent along, which includes their Top 5 films, TV shows, albums, novels and plays, is solid enough but adds nothing new to the firmament. We all love "Citizen Kane" and "The Wire" -- do we need another list saying so?
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"Citizen Kane"
"Citizen Kane"

Entertainment Weekly's upcoming edition (on newsstands June 28) is being trumpeted as their first All-Time Greatest issue. This means lists galore. The sneak peek they've sent along, which includes their Top 5 films, TV shows, albums, novels and plays, is solid enough but adds nothing new to the firmament. We all love "Citizen Kane" and "The Wire" -- do we need another list saying so?

Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo," which was crowned last year by Sight and Sound as the all-time greatest film, doesn't make EW's top five, though "Psycho" does.

Here's the 25 selections over five categories:

All-Time Greatest Movies:

1.     Citizen Kane -- Directed by Orson Welles, 1941, PG. Telling the story of a newspaper tycoon based on William Randolph Hearst, the 25-year-old genius Orson Welles poured his own swaggering, larger-than-life soul into a tragic and exuberant American saga of journalism, power, celebrity, idealism, betrayal, and lost love.

2.     The Godfather -- Directed by Francis Ford Coppola, 1972, R. Coppola’s tale of crime and family is the most mythic cinematic landmark of the past half century. It heightens Mafia violence into a metaphor for American corporate ruthlessness, presenting Marlon Brando’s Don Corleone as the grandest of movie criminals—a monster we revere for his courtly loyalty.

3.     Casablanca -- Directed by Michael Curtiz, 1942, PG. WWII movie perfection. Hollywood’s most celebrated love story was made as just an average studio pic but now exemplifies old-movie magic. Story, lighting, music, craftsmanship, and every glance between Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman resonate with a magnificence that even the brashest studio mogul couldn’t have predicted.

4.     Bonnie and Clyde -- Directed by Arthur Penn, 1967, R. A touchstone of screen violence, the exhilarating account of ’30s bank robbers Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker kicked open the door to the cinematic freedom of the post-studio-system era.

5.     Psycho -- Directed by Alfred Hitchcock, 1960, R. The granddaddy of all slasher films (as well as the most profound horror movie ever made), Hitchcock’s famous thriller takes the revolutionary step of killing off its heroine (Janet Leigh) halfway through, all as a way of placing the audience in the mind of a madman (Anthony Perkins).


 

All-Time Greatest TV Shows:

 

This article is related to: News, News, Entertainment Weekly


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.