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Fantastic Fest's Bumper Contest Poses a 30-Second Short Film Challenge

Photo of Jacob Combs By Jacob Combs | Thompson on Hollywood August 30, 2012 at 11:27AM

In an age of 140-character missives and abbreviated everything, brevity--it would seem--is the soul of communication. This year's Fantastic Fest's Bumper Contest is a challenge for those with a knack for (short) turns of phrases, a contest to take 30 seconds of video and make an audience cry with laughter.
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Fantastic Fest

In an age of 140-character missives and abbreviated everything, brevity--it would seem--is the soul of communication.  This year's Fantastic Fest's Bumper Contest is a challenge for those with a knack for (short) turns of phrases, a contest to take 30 seconds of video and make an audience cry with laughter.

The rules: using the phrase "Time Travel Is Fantastic" as a springboard, devise, create and produce a 15- to 45-second video that ends with the line "That's fantastic!"  Sure, it sounds a bit like a contest for marketing a new brand of "Fantastic!" tile cleaner, but what makes the Bumper Contest intriguing is what happens to the videos: Fantastic Fest will take as many of the entries "as posible" (they say) and play them before every film screening at the festival.

The top five bumpers will play at this Fantastic Fest's Award Ceremony, and the winner (to be chosen by the audience) will get two VIP passes to next year's festival.

For more rules about about submitting to the Bumper Contest, check out Fantastic Fest's website.

This article is related to: Festivals, Shorts, Shorts


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.