Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

First Look: YouTube Short Film Competition Aims for Venice Film Fest

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood January 19, 2012 at 6:30PM

YouTube is the place for randomly generated hilarity: falling cats, Rebecca Black ballads, and singing toddlers. But YouTube wants to change this perception. By launching a short film competition, YouTube is making an effort to find new talent, as opposed to accidental meme-generators.
0
youtube short comp

YouTube is the place for randomly generated hilarity: falling cats, Rebecca Black ballads, and singing toddlers. But YouTube wants to change this perception. By launching a short film competition, YouTube is making an effort to find new talent, as opposed to accidental meme-generators.

Thursday YouTube, along with Ridley Scott's Scott Free Productions, launched Your Film Festival, a global competition to find the world's best storytellers.  Ridley Scott said this plan to sponsor new filmmakers' entry into the industry will be "fantastic… short filmmaking is exactly where I started my career 50 years ago." YouTube worked with Scott Free on the critically acclaimed documentary "Life in a Day."

In their search for a 15-minute, story-driven short film, the contest will be whittled down to 50 semifinalists; audiences will vote for the top ten best films that will show at the 69th Venice International Film Festival in August. The Grand Prize Winner will land a $500,000 production grant and a development deal with Scott Free Production.

Submissions open February 2, 2012 and close March 31, 2012. More information here: youtube.com/yourfilmfestival.

This article is related to: Festivals, Shorts, YouTube


E-Mail Updates








Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.