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Foreign Box Office: Spielberg's Adventures of Tintin Opens Big Overseas

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood October 30, 2011 at 5:20AM

Sony and Paramount's move to open Peter Jackson and Steven Spielberg's The Adventures of Tintin overseas months ahead of its December stateside release --where the Herge comic books are beloved--is paying off. The performance capture film opened overseas with an estimated $55.8 million in 19 markets.
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Sony and Paramount's move to open Peter Jackson and Steven Spielberg's The Adventures of Tintin overseas months ahead of its December stateside release --where the Herge comic books are beloved--is paying off. The performance capture film opened overseas with an estimated $55.8 million in 19 markets.

Thompson on Hollywood

International distribution rights are shared by Sony Pictures International and Paramount Pictures International. The respective company totals for the weekend are: Sony: $45.1 million in 18 territories, Paramount $10.7 million in the UK. Seventeen of the 19 territories opened at number one. A studio breakdown of the totals is below.

France launched with $21.5 million 935 screens, the biggest opening ever for an original film (non-sequel) from Hollywood. Collecting a 39% market share for the weekend and grossing more than 4½ times the number two film in the market, the opening was 80% bigger than Indiana Jones and the Crystal Skull, 41% bigger than Spider-Man, 50% bigger than both Alice in Wonderland and Ratatouille and is the second-biggest opening of the year there (behind the final Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows).

The UK (Paramount) opened to $10.7 million, first in the market, 189% bigger than the opening of The Smurfs and 116% bigger than Sherlock Holmes. Spain earned $6.7 million on 798 screens, capturing 50% of the market and grossing nearly ten times the number two film. This opening is double that of The Smurfs, 89% more than Iron Man 2, 37% bigger than Sherlock Holmes, and 21% more than Toy Story 3. Germany bowed with $4.6 million on 847 screens, number one in the market at three times the gross of the number two film. This opening is 42% bigger than Iron Man 2, 10% bigger than Sherlock Holmes and 13% more than Toy Story 3.

Herge's home country of Belgium delivered $2.1 million from 169 screens, the second-biggest opening of the year there. This bow was 52% bigger than Crystal Skull, five times the opening of Toy Story 3, four times the opening of Sherlock Holmes, 56% bigger than Spider-Man 3, and 2% bigger than The Smurfs. Sweden grossed a $1.9 million on 297 screens, one in the market and 22% bigger than Crystal Skull, more than double Iron Man 2, 145% bigger than Sherlock Holmes, 84% bigger than The Smurfs, and 20% bigger than Toy Story 3. Switzerland brought in $1.8 million from 174 screens and was also one in the market, three times the opening of Toy Story 3, more than double the openings of Iron Man 2 and The Smurfs 70% bigger than Sherlock Holmes.

Denmark grossed $1.6 million on 221 screens, the third biggest opening of the year and 5% bigger than Crystal Skull, more than double The Smurfs, more than triple Sherlock Holmes, and 55% bigger than Spider-Man 3. Holland earned $1.3 million on 250 screens, 5% bigger than The Smurfs, more than triple Toy Story 3, 81% bigger than Iron Man 2, 48% bigger than Sherlock Holmes, and 12% more than Spider-Man 3.

This article is related to: Box Office, Directors, Genres, Headliners, Studios, Box Office, Fall, Steven Spielberg, Peter Jackson, Comics, Animation, Foreign, Sony/Screen Gems/Sony Pictures Classics, Paramount/Vantage/Insurge/CBS


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Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.