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Marketing Watch: 'Frankenweenie' E-Book Free on iTunes

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood September 24, 2012 at 12:15PM

Disney's promo materials on Tim Burton's "Frankenweenie" have been innovative and choice. Their latest offering is a content-rich e-book tie-in. "Frankenweenie: An Electrifying Book" provides a behind-the-scenes examination of the world of the original 1984 short film that inspired the upcoming feature length production. Here's our "Fantastic Fest" review of "Frankenweenie"; latest clips and featurette are here.
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Frankenweenie E-Book

Disney's promo materials on Tim Burton's "Frankenweenie" have been fun and innovative. Their latest offering is a content-rich e-book tie-in.  "Frankenweenie: An Electrifying Book" provides a behind-the-scenes examination of the world of the original 1984 short film that inspired the upcoming feature length production. Here's our "Fantastic Fest" review of "Frankenweenie"; latest clips and featurette are here.

The immersive e-book features original art and production photographs from the stop-motion film as well as interviews with the creative forces behind the movie, 3-D model characters, video, and music.  Actor Martin Landau pens the foreword; he voices the character of Mr. Rzykruski, Victor Frankenstein's grade school science teacher in the movie.

Though the book is packed with original content, there's no such thing as a free lunch.  The music portion links to the soundtrack and score, for purchase on iTunes.  Additionally, "Frankenweenie: An Electrifying Book" contains a feature to guide readers to locate movie theaters where the Burton film will play, begining October 5, as well as a feature to purchase tickets. 


 

This article is related to: Tim Burton, Tim Burton, Frankenweenie, New Media & Technology, Walt Disney Pictures, Tim Burton, Marketing


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.