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WATCH: Gareth Edwards Talks Stunning 'Godzilla' Sequence for NYT Anatomy of a Scene

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood May 20, 2014 at 2:06PM

Gareth Edwards' "Godzilla," which roared mightily with $93 million at the box office this past weekend, is one of the more visually spectacular tentpoles in recent memory. But what may be the most showstopping sequence of the film has less to do with giant lizards and Mutos than it does with humans. Edwards apparently thinks so too -- he picked the "halo jump" sequence (where star Aaron Taylor-Johnson freefalls out of an airplane with his fellow soldiers) as the one to discuss for the NYT's Anatomy of a Scene video featurette.
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The halo jump in 'Godzilla'
The halo jump in 'Godzilla'

Gareth Edwards' "Godzilla," which roared mightily with $93 million at the box office this past weekend, is one of the more visually spectacular tentpoles in recent memory. But what may be the most showstopping sequence of the film has less to do with giant lizards and Mutos than it does with humans. Edwards apparently thinks so too -- he picked the "halo jump" sequence (where star Aaron Taylor-Johnson freefalls out of an airplane with his fellow soldiers) as the one to discuss for the NYT's Anatomy of a Scene video featurette.

It's a great use of visuals -- men plummeting through the skies like burning red falling stars -- as well as music. If you've seen Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey," the score in this sequence may sound familiar. Edwards discusses the combination of CG and actual footage used to achieve the scene. Watch below.

This article is related to: Video, Video, Godziilla, Gareth Edwards, New York Times


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.