Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Top 10 Takeaways: 'Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation' Opens Strong, But Summer 2015 Has Peaked Top 10 Takeaways: 'Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation' Opens Strong, But Summer 2015 Has Peaked Arthouse Audit: Controversy Reigns as 'End of the Tour' Tops Limited Newbies and Weinstein Dumps Jeunet's Latest Arthouse Audit: Controversy Reigns as 'End of the Tour' Tops Limited Newbies and Weinstein Dumps Jeunet's Latest Friday Box Office: Cruise and 'Mission: Impossible' Do Their Part, But Grosses Lag Friday Box Office: Cruise and 'Mission: Impossible' Do Their Part, But Grosses Lag Fall Calendar Reveals Awards Itinerary and Stealth Contenders Fall Calendar Reveals Awards Itinerary and Stealth Contenders Sarajevo Film Fest Lineup Has Auteurs, Cannes Winners and Favorites Sarajevo Film Fest Lineup Has Auteurs, Cannes Winners and Favorites Jason Segel Takes On David Foster Wallace in Controversial 'End of the Tour' (VIDEO) Jason Segel Takes On David Foster Wallace in Controversial 'End of the Tour' (VIDEO) First Look: Cynthia Nixon Plays—and Narrates—Emily Dickinson in Two Films First Look: Cynthia Nixon Plays—and Narrates—Emily Dickinson in Two Films Troubled Western 'Jane Got a Gun' Rescued as Relativity Files for Bankruptcy (Updated) Troubled Western 'Jane Got a Gun' Rescued as Relativity Files for Bankruptcy (Updated) Read Martin Scorsese's Column on His Favorite Hollywood Leading Ladies Read Martin Scorsese's Column on His Favorite Hollywood Leading Ladies A Woman in Charge: Warner Bros. Names Sue Kroll Head of Global Distribution A Woman in Charge: Warner Bros. Names Sue Kroll Head of Global Distribution Netflix and Marvel Shake Up TCAs, Amazon Rescues Bryan Cranston Pilot Netflix and Marvel Shake Up TCAs, Amazon Rescues Bryan Cranston Pilot 'The Witch' Won't Open Until 2016, But Its Sundance-Winning Director Has a New Film 'The Witch' Won't Open Until 2016, But Its Sundance-Winning Director Has a New Film Charles Aidikoff Screening Room Shutters: End of an Era for LA Critics? Charles Aidikoff Screening Room Shutters: End of an Era for LA Critics? How HBO's 'Ballers' Fails Sports Fans How HBO's 'Ballers' Fails Sports Fans Michael Moore Reveals Stealth NSA Project 'Where to Invade Next' on Periscope Michael Moore Reveals Stealth NSA Project 'Where to Invade Next' on Periscope Showtime Chief on David Lynch's 'Twin Peaks' Revival: "It's His Show" Showtime Chief on David Lynch's 'Twin Peaks' Revival: "It's His Show" Toronto Film Festival Lineup: What Did They Get? Toronto Film Festival Lineup: What Did They Get? Discover the Brothers Quay, Identical Twin Animators Who Inspired Christopher Nolan Discover the Brothers Quay, Identical Twin Animators Who Inspired Christopher Nolan Jill Soloway Says "There Is an All Out-Attack" on Female Filmmakers Jill Soloway Says "There Is an All Out-Attack" on Female Filmmakers Why Kevin Costner Paid for 'Black or White' (New Trailer, Sneak Preview Q & A) Why Kevin Costner Paid for 'Black or White' (New Trailer, Sneak Preview Q & A)

Holiday Wrap: Weak Box Office, True Grit Takes on Little Fockers, Black Swan, King's Speech Score

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood January 2, 2011 at 6:22AM

The box office continued tepid during what should have been a robust holiday period with North American families on vacation; it was down 26 percent from last year. For the year, the 2010 3-D-pumped domestic box office totaled $10.5 billion, down 0.3 percent from 2009's Avatar-inflated record of $10.6 billion. But the attendance stat provides a sobering reality check: attendance was down a whopping 5 percent: 1.34 billion against 1.41 billion in 2009. 
1
Thompson on Hollywood
Thompson on Hollywood

The box office continued tepid during what should have been a robust holiday period with North American families on vacation; it was down 26 percent from last year. For the year, the 2010 3-D-pumped domestic box office totaled $10.5 billion, down 0.3 percent from 2009's Avatar-inflated record of $10.6 billion. But the attendance stat provides a sobering reality check: attendance was down a whopping 5 percent: 1.34 billion against 1.41 billion in 2009. 

It didn't help that no studio released a blockbuster for the 2010 holiday season. This left the field wide open for mainstream crowd pleasers Little Fockers and True Grit. The two pictures duked it out in their second weekend, with Universal/Relativity's Fockers emerging slightly ahead of Paramount's Grit with $26.3 million over $24.5 million, respectively, although the Jeff Bridges western edged ahead of Fockers as the highest-grosser on the last day of 2010.

The Coens' well-reviewed Grit marks a model of success, as it cost $38 million, while Universal's $100-million-plus Ben Stiller/Robert De Niro comedy sequel came out behind industry expectations, even though it passed $100 million in 12 days and should score $300 million worldwide.

On the other hand, the Coens delivered by far their most commercially successful performer to date. With an estimated $86.7 million total gross since it opened on December 22, Grit has easily outpaced the Coens' Oscar-winner No Country For Old Men, which earned $74.2 million.

Paramount is all grins as the studio is not only releasing Fockers internationally, but the holiday box office also smiled on their expansion of David O. Russell's Relativity-financed $25 million The Fighter, which improved its gross over the prior weekend, and has earned an estimated $46.3 million so far. Both Grit and Fighter will gain valuable box office momentum during the upcoming awards season. So will specialty Oscar contenders Black Swan and The King's Speech, which broadened successfully to place the top ten, while Blue Valentine and Another Year pulled strong numbers in limited release. (Full story at indieWIRE.)

Disney's $150-million-plus sci-fi fantasy Tron: Legacy is not the comeback phenom that the studio was banking on. Placing third in the holiday sweepstakes with $18.3 million, its worldwide gross is just $240 million worldwide. The picture will barely make back its negative and marketing costs.

Per usual, family films such as Tangled and Yogi Bear got a holiday boost of 56% and 66%, respectively.   

Going into the new year, things are not expected to look up with the wide release of Gwyneth Paltrow vehicle Country Strong or Nic Cage in Season of the Witch.

Top Ten Box Office Chart:


1. Little Fockers (Universal): $26.3 million in its second weekend at 3554 theaters. $7400 theater average. Domestic total: $103.2 million.

2. True Grit (Paramount): $24.5 million in its second weekend at 3083 theaters. $7947 theater average. Domestic total: $86.7 million.

3. Tron:Legacy (Disney): $18.3 million in its third weekend at 3365 theaters. $5440 theater average. Domestic total: $130.8 million.

4. Yogi Bear (Warner Bros.): $13 million in its third weekend at 3515 theaters. $3698 theater average. Domestic total: $66 million.

5. Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Fox): $10.5 million in its fourth weekend at 2948 theaters. $3562 theater average. Domestic total: $87 million.

6. Tangled (Disney): $10 million in its sixth weekend at 2582 theaters. $3876 theater average. Domestic total: $168 million.

7. The Fighter (Paramount): $10 million in its fourth weekend in 2534 theaters. $3946 theater average. Domestic total: $46.3 million.

8. Gulliver's Travels (Fox): $9.1 million in its second weekend in 3089 theaters. $2946 theater average. Domestic total: $27 million.

9. Black Swan (Fox Searchlight): $8.4 million in its fifth weekend in 1553 theaters. $5441 theater average. Domestic total: $47.4 million.

10. The King's Speech (The Weinstein Co.): $7.6 million in its sixth weekend in 700 theaters. $10,927 theater average. Domestic total: $22.8 million.

This article is related to: Box Office, Directors, Franchises, Headliners, Independents, Studios, Winter, Coens, Darren Aronofsky, Tom Hooper, Narnia, TRON, Jeff Bridges, Weinsteins, Warner Bros./New Line, Fox Searchlight, Twentieth Century Fox, Paramount/Vantage/Insurge/CBS, Disney


E-Mail Updates








Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.