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'Blue is the Warmest Color' Earns NC-17 Rating, Will Go Out Uncut (FRENCH TRAILER)

Thompson on Hollywood By Anne Thompson and Tom Brueggemann | Thompson on Hollywood August 20, 2013 at 9:36PM

It's no surprise that Cannes Palme d'Or winner "Blue is the Warmest Color" has earned an NC-17 rating for “explicit sexual content.” Sundance Selects/IFC Films figured that would be the case when they submitted it. They're stirring up some ratings controversy to lure people to see the lesbian romance starring two lovingly photographed nubile French actresses. They could go unrated stateside if they wanted to. They want audiences to know that the film is not trimmed or softened in any way.

BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR centers on a 15-year-old girl named Adèle (Exarchopoulos) who is climbing to adulthood and dreams of experiencing her first love. A handsome male classmate falls for her hard, but an unsettling erotic reverie upsets the romance before it begins. Adèle imagines that the mysterious, blue-haired girl she encountered in the street slips into her bed and possesses her with an overwhelming pleasure. That blue-haired girl is a confident older art student named Emma (Seydoux), who will soon enter Adèle's life for real, making way for an intense and complicated love story that spans a decade and is touchingly universal in its depiction.

This article is related to: MPAA, Blue is the Warmest Color , IFC Films, IFC, Academy Awards, Awards, Oscars

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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.