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In the Works: 'Coraline' Director Moves to Live-Action with 'A Tale Dark and Grimm'

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood October 17, 2013 at 12:36PM

"Coraline" director Henry Selick is set to helm a live-action version of "A Tale Dark and Grimm," based on the book by Adam Gidwitz, where Hansel and Gretel escape their own ominous fairy tale only to be met with eight successive fairytales to navigate, all dark and fearsome.
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"Coraline"
"Coraline"

"Coraline" director Henry Selick is set to helm a live-action version of "A Tale Dark and Grimm," based on the book by Adam Gidwitz, where Hansel and Gretel escape their own ominous fairy tale only to be met with eight successive fairytales to navigate, all dark and fearsome. In the book, an irreverent narrator takes the reader through each of the siblings' travails.

A Tale Dark and Grimm

John W. Mann and Jon Gunn penned the adaptation, with contributions from Selick.

Selick, who was Oscar nominated for "Coraline," told Variety in a statement that the project is "a hilarious, deeply inventive tale about survival in the world of fairytales and what it takes to forgive one’s parents." His other directing credits include "The Nightmare Before Christmas" and "James and the Giant Peach."

Last year, Disney took a $50 million write-off for Selick's then in-the-works stop motion feature, at one point titled "ShadeMaker," reportedly because it was too dark in tone and too slow in production. Selick was then briefly in talks about the project with Laika, the Portland animation house and producer of "Coraline," but that fell through, too. (Selick and Laika parted ways following "Coraline.")

This article is related to: News, Henry Selick, Henry Selick, News


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.