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In the Works: Joe Cornish Attached to Adapt Neal Stephenson's Cyber Thriller 'Snow Crash'

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood June 15, 2012 at 4:27PM

Joe Cornish, director of last year's badass alien-invasion-social-problem hybrid "Attack the Block," is now attached to write and direct author Neal Stephenson's 1992 thriller "Snow Crash," which Time lists as one of the all-time best English-language novels since 1923. The novel has long been considered unfilmable.
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Joe Cornish
Joe Cornish

Joe Cornish, director of last year's badass alien-invasion-social-problem hybrid "Attack the Block," is now attached to write and direct author Neal Stephenson's 1992 thriller "Snow Crash," which Time Magazine lists as one of the all-time best English-language novels since 1923. While the novel was grabbed by studio producers at the time of its publishing, it's long been considered unfilmable.

"Snow Crash" is set in the former half of the 21st century (dates unspecified), and follows hacker Hiro Protagonist who discovers a computer virus/drug called Snow Crash with the terrifying power to affect users in both their physical and virtual lives. As the use of Snow Crash becomes an epidemic, Hiro must figure out why it was created in the first place.

Cornish did a bang-up job with "Attack the Block," breathing scary, razor-edge life into what is often a tired genre. (Those hairy, glowing-eyed aliens are some of the freshest and most horrifying in recent memory, along with the powder-white proto-humans in "Prometheus.") We're fascinated to see what he does with an adaptation that's been daunting the industry for 20 years.

Check out the TOH interview with Cornish:

This article is related to: Joe Cornish, Joe Cornish, Attack The Block


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.