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How Do We Drag Indie Film into the 21st Century?

Thompson on Hollywood By Chris Dorr | Thompson on Hollywood March 28, 2014 at 3:35PM

Most filmmakers do not understand the difference between “direct” and “indirect”. This gap in understanding holds many (if not most) indie filmmakers back. How can this gap be closed and indie film dragged into the 21st century?
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Spike Lee in his Kickstarter video
Spike Lee in his Kickstarter video

Platforms, like KickstarterIndieGoGoVHXVimeoTugg and YouTube are designed for indies who are prepared to reach their audience through "direct distribution."

It is not the responsibility of the platform to get your audience—it is yours. Each platform gives you tools that help you achieve success but in order to succeed you have to aggressively use them.

This approach is fundamentally different from licensing your film to a traditional distributor, a method I would call "indirect distribution."

Most filmmakers do not understand the difference between "direct" and "indirect." This gap in understanding holds many (if not most) indie filmmakers back.

How can this gap be closed and indie film dragged into the 21st century?

Let’s imagine an audience fund for indie film

We start with 1 million dollars.  We want to underwrite direct distribution for up to 15 films that will be released roughly over the same year period.  We will put in between 50K to 100K per movie.

Filmmakers must have skin in the game so we require a few things from them.

Read the rest of the story here.

This article is related to: Crowdfunding, News, Kickstarter , Indiegogo


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.