Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Cary Fukunaga Finds His Evil Clown Pennywise for 'It' Remake Cary Fukunaga Finds His Evil Clown Pennywise for 'It' Remake Watch: Ryan Gosling Finally Eats His Cereal in Tribute to Meme Creator Ryan McHenry Watch: Ryan Gosling Finally Eats His Cereal in Tribute to Meme Creator Ryan McHenry Quentin Tarantino Enjoys Running the New Beverly, Even When He's Shooting a Movie Quentin Tarantino Enjoys Running the New Beverly, Even When He's Shooting a Movie See Andrew Garfield in First Images from Martin Scorsese's 'Silence' See Andrew Garfield in First Images from Martin Scorsese's 'Silence' Carey Mulligan Just Says No, Goes Full Feminist with 'Far from the Madding Crowd' and 'Suffragette' Carey Mulligan Just Says No, Goes Full Feminist with 'Far from the Madding Crowd' and 'Suffragette' 6 Things Non-Record-Breaker 'Avengers: Age of Ultron' Reveals about the Current Box Office 6 Things Non-Record-Breaker 'Avengers: Age of Ultron' Reveals about the Current Box Office Box Office: 'Far from the Madding Crowd' Starring Carey Mulligan Leads Specialty Openers Box Office: 'Far from the Madding Crowd' Starring Carey Mulligan Leads Specialty Openers Guillermo del Toro Feted at San Francisco Film Fest: "I saw my first corpse at age 4" (Video) Guillermo del Toro Feted at San Francisco Film Fest: "I saw my first corpse at age 4" (Video) Oscar Predictions 2016 Oscar Predictions 2016 It Looks Like David Lynch's 'Mulholland Drive' Is Indeed Coming to Criterion It Looks Like David Lynch's 'Mulholland Drive' Is Indeed Coming to Criterion Cary Fukunaga Teams with 'Brokeback Mountain' Writers for A24's First Original Film Cary Fukunaga Teams with 'Brokeback Mountain' Writers for A24's First Original Film Amy Berg's Sex Abuse Doc 'An Open Secret' Finally Lands Distribution, Goes to Cannes Amy Berg's Sex Abuse Doc 'An Open Secret' Finally Lands Distribution, Goes to Cannes Whither Sony? No Place to Go But Up Whither Sony? No Place to Go But Up Hollywood, Please Don't Remake Nicolas Roeg's 'Don't Look Now' Hollywood, Please Don't Remake Nicolas Roeg's 'Don't Look Now' Riviera Maya Film Fest Dares to Bring Edgy Fare to Cinema-Starved Mexican Audiences Riviera Maya Film Fest Dares to Bring Edgy Fare to Cinema-Starved Mexican Audiences Cannes First Look: Hou Hsiao-Hsien's Long-Awaited Martial Arts Epic 'The Assassin' Cannes First Look: Hou Hsiao-Hsien's Long-Awaited Martial Arts Epic 'The Assassin' '54: The Director's Cut' Comes to Digital HD in All Its Hedonistic Glory '54: The Director's Cut' Comes to Digital HD in All Its Hedonistic Glory Mark Hamill Shares Vintage Photos from the 'Star Wars' Set Mark Hamill Shares Vintage Photos from the 'Star Wars' Set Hear a Rare Recording of One of Stanley Kubrick's Most Revealing Interviews Hear a Rare Recording of One of Stanley Kubrick's Most Revealing Interviews Watch: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Tina Fey, Patricia Arquette and Amy Schumer Hilariously Slam Hollywood Sexism (NSFW) Watch: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Tina Fey, Patricia Arquette and Amy Schumer Hilariously Slam Hollywood Sexism (NSFW)

Interview: Rupert Friend Talks Directing Short Film Debut 'Steve,' Starring Knightley and Firth

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood September 26, 2012 at 11:45AM

In Rupert Friend's short movie "Steve," the first-time director uses his sixteen minutes of film to put a tense twist on a slice-of-life portrait of neighbors interacting in a anonymous city. "Steve" is part of the Stars in Shorts series premiering this Friday.
0
Keira Knightley and Tom Mison in "Steve"; Director Rupert Friend
Keira Knightley and Tom Mison in "Steve"; Director Rupert Friend

In Rupert Friend's short movie "Steve," the first-time director uses his sixteen minutes of film to put a tense twist on a slice-of-life portrait of neighbors interacting in a anonymous city.  Although it was completed in 2010, "Steve" is one of the short films in the Stars in Shorts series premiering this Friday; our review of "Steve" and the other six short films here.

Known as an actor, Friend played Mr. Wickham in 2005's "Pride and Prejudice," Prince Albert in the 2009 film "The Young Victoria," and Lieutenant Kurt Kotler in 2008's "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas."  

In Friend's directorial debut, Colin Firth plays a neighbor who asks for a cup of tea from the couple living upstairs, Keira Knightley and Tom Mison. Although Steve's requests appear to be pleasant and run-of-the-mill, Friend something is lurking in Steve's neediness.  Through the course of the short film, notions of politesse, manners, and propriety are disturbed.  

We talked to Friend about directing, his notions of social graces, his "anger about tea," and Hemingway's trick about only revealing the tip of iceberg.  

Colin Firth in "Steve"
Colin Firth in "Steve"
TOH: What is the overall mood of "Steve"?  How did you set the tone?

RF:  There is something off-kilter we were striving for. As when a foreigner adopts a very familiar colloquialism and something doesn't ever quite land right when he uses it. It's something that you can't put your finger on, a feeling. That odd happenstance that inexplicably draws us to some people and away from others. I like that feeling, in the gut, it's going to mystify me for a long time.

TOH: What was the beginning of the idea of "Steve"?  

RF:  I had a lot of anger against the way things 'should be done' - conforming to social norms, ticking boxes to gain acceptance. Frustration at the pointlessness and predictability of smalltalk. Oh and a lot of anger about tea, which the British seem to use to avoid actually saying anything.

TOH Have the social situations sparked by apartment living interested you?

RF:  I really love living in cities where the people living above, below and next to you are from totally different worlds to you. The white-bread cookie-cutter alternative sounds pretty scary - I think Tim Burton nailed that in his suburban opening to "Edward Scissorhands." The image of all the cars leaving pastel-colored people at the same time has never really left me as an anti-ambition for life!

TOH:  Firth's character, "Steve," becomes more mysterious and compelling.  How did you do this?

RF:  Everybody has many people inside of them, I think we tend to present the one we feel is most appropriate at first, in order to gain acceptance or achieve what we want. It gets really interesting when this technique fails, and other levels are revealed. I think Hemingway said you should only ever reveal the tip of the iceberg, but you should know that the whole thing is there under the water regardless. I was very interested in working with an actor as talented as Firth, who is known primarily for the reserve, grace and politesse that he brings to his roles, and seeing if he wouldn't enjoy exploring the somewhat murkier waters beneath, if you'll pardon the now slightly clumsy mixed metaphor.

TOH: Who would you say is the most central character of the short?  How did you navigate between the three?

RF:  I never thought of any of them as more central than the others. to me it was very much about the idea of three, which has always been a powerful number for me. Three acts, three characters, three wishes... They all support one another so well I couldn't imagine it working with anyone missing. There is a sense that Man is always absent just when Steve arrives, they have that dance around Woman, who isn't particularly interested in seeing either of them at the time.

This article is related to: Rupert Friend, Shorts, Short Film, Keira Knightley, Colin Firth, Colin Firth, Interviews, Interviews, Interviews


E-Mail Updates