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Can Fox Searchlight Turn 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' Into a Serious Oscar Contender?

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood May 7, 2014 at 12:47PM

Wes Anderson's "The Grand Budapest Hotel" could very well be a major awards player in 2014. The specialty box office sensation (almost $52 million domestic at the time of writing, and $140 million worldwide) is in the Top Ten two months after its initial release. It could score Oscar nominations for director, writer, actor, art direction, score, costumes and cinematography, as well as being a popular contender for critics awards come the year's end. It does happen.
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"The Grand Budapest Hotel"
Fox Searchlight "The Grand Budapest Hotel"

Even though it came out early in the year--supposedly a no-can-do for awards contention--Wes Anderson's "The Grand Budapest Hotel" could very well be a major player in 2014. The specialty box office sensation (almost $52 million domestic at the time of writing, and $140 million worldwide) is in the Top Ten two months after its initial release. It could score Oscar nominations for director, writer, actor, art direction, score, costumes and cinematography, as well as being a popular contender for critics awards come the year's end. 

It does happen.

Anderson is overdue. He entered the Cannes auteur pantheon with Focus Features' "Moonrise Kingdom," but because he was hanging back in Europe he did not participate on the campaign trail, leaving those duties to Roman Coppola--and did wind up with an original screenplay nomination, which he also got for "The Royal Tenenbaums" in 2002, and was nominated for best animated feature for "The Fantastic Mr. Fox." 

"The Grand Budapest Hotel" arrives on Blu-ray and DVD June 17. 

This article is related to: Awards, Awards, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Wes Anderson, Wes Anderson, Blu-ray, DVD / Blu-Ray


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.