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Italian Producers Gori vs. Nunnari: Judge Rules $14 Million in Lost Profits to Gori

Thompson on Hollywood By Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood September 3, 2010 at 2:44AM

- An L.A. Superior Court Judge has ruled (tentatively) in favor of Italian film mogul Vittorio Cecchi Gori (pictured, right) and against producer Gianni Nunnari (pictured, left) (The Departed, Shutter Island, 300, From Dusk Till Dawn).
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Thompson on Hollywood


- An L.A. Superior Court Judge has ruled (tentatively) in favor of Italian film mogul Vittorio Cecchi Gori (pictured, right) and against producer Gianni Nunnari (pictured, left) (The Departed, Shutter Island, 300, From Dusk Till Dawn).

Gori, who produced with his father Mario best picture Oscar-nominee Il Postino [1994], is no stranger to bankruptcy. The L.A. judge ruled that Gori is entitled to almost $14 million in lost profits (from films including 300, Silence and Everybody's Fine) due to his ex-employee's conflict-of-interest on outside projects. Nunnari's lawyer maintained that Gori granted Nunnari permission to work on other projects that did not get in the way of his duties. Gori's lawyers, however, contended that Nunnari took advantage of his trust and dedicated his energy toward his own Hollywood Gang projects.

Both parties are allowed to submit a memo to the judge regarding the tentative ruling. The good news for Nunnari's wallet is that he has 15 producing projects in development (including Zack Snyder's Xerxes [2011], an untitled Robin Hood project [2012], a futuristic Ronin [2012], Odysseus [2013], and The Last Photograph [2013], which will see Christian Bale travel to war-torn Afghanistan. At this point, Gori is far less active.

This article is related to: Hollywood, Moguls, Studios, News, Production


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Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.