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J.J. Abrams to Develop 'Twilight Zone' Maestro Rod Serling's Final Screenplay

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood June 5, 2013 at 3:35PM

J.J. Abrams' Bad Robot banner has finalized a deal with the estate of Rod Serling, sci-fi screenwriter and "Twilight Zone" host, to develop a series based on Serling's unproduced screenplay, "The Stops Along the Way." The script is reportedly the writer's final completed work before his death in 1975. The few bits of gleaned information on it, via Serling's widow, describe it as "a little bit of fantasy, a little bit of imagination... [it] takes place over a long period of time."
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J.J. Abrams

J.J. Abrams' Bad Robot banner has finalized a deal with the estate of Rod Serling, sci-fi screenwriter and "Twilight Zone" host, to develop a series based on Serling's unproduced screenplay, "The Stops Along the Way." The script is reportedly the writer's final completed work before his death in 1975. The few bits of gleaned information on it, via Serling's widow, describe it as "a little bit of fantasy, a little bit of imagination... [it] takes place over a long period of time."

TV sensation-turned-big screen director Abrams, whose "Star Trek Into Darkness" is currently in theaters and who has the next "Star Wars" installment looming, has long cited "The Twilight Zone" as a chief inspiration. 

Serling's teleplays for the show are considered highlights in its five-year run from 1959 to 1964; his Playhouse 90 works, including "Requiem for a Heavyweight," "A Town Has Turned to Dust" and "The Comedian," are lauded as television triumphs. He also takes credit for co-penning the 1968 classic "Planet of the Apes."


This article is related to: Television, TV News, J.J. Abrams


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.