Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Kehr on Keaton

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood July 4, 2010 at 10:32AM

A required read for any self-respecting cinephile is critic Dave Kehr's weekly DVD column in the NYT. At a time when most new movies don't offer much to digest for the sophisticated film critic, Kehr has the best beat in town: DVDs. Every week, Kehr shares his erudite knowledge and elegant prose style. And he outdoes himself with this week's essay on the greatest silent comedian, Buster Keaton, who like his rival Charlie Chaplin, directed his own films--but for too short a time. (A new DVD of Steamboat Bill, Jr. is hitting stores, as well as Lost Keaton, which includes sixteen Educational Pictures shorts he made in the 30s.)
1
Thompson on Hollywood

A required read for any self-respecting cinephile is critic Dave Kehr's weekly DVD column in the NYT. At a time when most new movies don't offer much to digest for the sophisticated film critic, Kehr has the best beat in town: DVDs. Every week, Kehr shares his erudite knowledge and elegant prose style. And he outdoes himself with this week's essay on the greatest silent comedian, Buster Keaton, who like his rival Charlie Chaplin, directed his own films--but for too short a time. (A new DVD of Steamboat Bill, Jr. is hitting stores, as well as Lost Keaton, which includes sixteen Educational Pictures shorts he made in the 30s.)

I fell in love with Buster in high school, when a series of his shorts and features was hitting theaters around the country after decades on the shelf. I watched every single one, read the tragic Rudi Blesh biography, and when I went to college, slapped a Keaton poster on my wall and a straw boater on the head of my big-eyed boyfriend Peter, who was perfect casting for my own super-8 Keaton short.

This article is related to: Genres, Stuck In Love, Reviews, DVDs, comedy, Classics, Critics


E-Mail Updates








Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.