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Following Ratings Hits 'The Bible' and 'Killing Lincoln', Nat Geo Scoops Up Bill O'Reilly's 'Killing Jesus'

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood March 26, 2013 at 3:10PM

The New Testament is trending. Following on the heels of the History Channel's mighty ratings hit "The Bible," which attracted 12 million viewers over its first two Sunday airings, the National Geographic Channel is again partnering with Ridley Scott and Bill O'Reilly for the TV personality-author's recently announced book "Killing Jesus: A History," which he co-wrote with Martin Dugard. The Tom Hanks-narrated Nat Geo adaptation of O'Reilly's bestseller "Killing Lincoln" broke the network's records, drawing 3.4 million viewers in February.
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Bill O'Reilly
Bill O'Reilly

The New Testament is trending. Following on the heels of the History Channel's mighty ratings hit "The Bible," which attracted 12 million viewers over its first two Sunday airings, the National Geographic Channel is again partnering with Ridley Scott and Bill O'Reilly for the TV personality-author's recently announced book "Killing Jesus: A History," which he co-wrote with Martin Dugard. The Tom Hanks-narrated Nat Geo adaptation of O'Reilly's bestseller "Killing Lincoln" broke the network's records, drawing 3.4 million viewers in February.

The March 25 announcement came as Nat Geo is in pre-production on O'Reilly's "Killing Kennedy: The End of Camelot," which is scheduled to air later this year.

O'Reilly stated that "Jesus is the most famous person that has ever lived -- and is worshipped today by more than 2.2 billion people."

If the "Lincoln" installment is any indication, Nat Geo's swift nabbing of O'Reilly's "Killing" series will continue to make a killing in ratings.


This article is related to: News, News, National Geographic Entertainment


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.