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'Les Miserables' Soundtrack Scores on Charts, Hathaway's 'I Dreamed a Dream' Soars

Thompson on Hollywood By Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood January 2, 2013 at 2:53PM

When "Les Miserables: Highlights From the Motion Picture Soundtrack" debuted on December 21, it claimed the top spot of Billboard's soundtrack chart. In three days it sold 43,000 copies, 60% of which were digital downloads. The most popular of the 20 tracks included in the album is Anne Hathaway's "I Dreamed a Dream" (20,000 copies sold in three days); it may win her the Best Supporting Actress Oscar. The soundtrack has also taken the top spot on both iTunes (before being pushed to No. 2 by Mumford & Sons' "Babel") and Amazon. "I Dreamed a Dream" is iTunes' 27th most-downloaded track.
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Les Miserables Hathaway
'Les Miserables'

When "Les Miserables: Highlights From the Motion Picture Soundtrack" debuted on December 21, it claimed the top spot of Billboard's soundtrack chart. In three days it sold 43,000 copies, 60% of which were digital downloads. The most popular of the 20 tracks included in the album is Anne Hathaway's "I Dreamed a Dream" (20,000 copies sold in three days); it may win her the Best Supporting Actress Oscar.

The soundtrack has also taken the top spot on both iTunes (before being pushed to No. 2 by Mumford & Sons' "Babel") and Amazon. "I Dreamed a Dream" is iTunes' 27th most-downloaded track.

Director Tom Hooper had the cast sing their songs live while listening to piano accompaniment through an earpiece. Hugh Jackman's "Suddenly" was written for the film and is eligible for the Best Original Song Oscar.

Watch and listen to "Les Miserables" featurettes here.

[TheWrap, Playbill]

This article is related to: Les Miserables, Anne Hathaway, Musical, Sound and Score, News, News


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.