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Listen: Bruce Springsteen Interviewed by Ed Norton

Thompson on Hollywood By Anne Thompson and Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood November 16, 2010 at 9:24AM

Edward Norton interviewed his friend Bruce Springsteen back in September during the Toronto International Film Festival, which you can hear below thanks to NPR's Fresh Air. Their discussion delves deep into Springsteen's motivations, investigates the making of Springsteen's album Darkness on the Edge of Town, and the documentary film which premiered at TIFF, The Promise: The Making of 'Darkness on the Edge of Town'. A box set, The Promise, comes out today, complete with a remastered version of the album, two CDs of songs that were recorded but never included in the original album, the documentary film, and DVDs of live performances.
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Thompson on Hollywood


Edward Norton interviewed his friend Bruce Springsteen back in September during the Toronto International Film Festival, which you can hear below thanks to NPR's Fresh Air. Their discussion delves deep into Springsteen's motivations, investigates the making of Springsteen's album Darkness on the Edge of Town, and the documentary film which premiered at TIFF, The Promise: The Making of 'Darkness on the Edge of Town'. A box set, The Promise, comes out today, complete with a remastered version of the album, two CDs of songs that were recorded but never included in the original album, the documentary film, and DVDs of live performances.

The LAT reviews the set:

"The masterwork in question was the album that, Springsteen writes in the set's liner notes, granted him an adult voice. 'More than rich, more than famous, more than happy, I wanted to be great,' the 61-year-old admits, chuckling at the twentysomething egotist he was then, in Thom Zimny's fine film…This archival set goes to exhaustive lengths to prove that Springsteen accomplished his goal."

The audio interview, which includes Springsteen's version of Because The Night (made famous by Patti Smith), as well as NPR's transcribed highlights from the Norton-Springsteen interview, are after the jump.


On Darkness In Music
"Some of the greatest blues music is some of the darkest music you've ever heard. And I had maps. Obviously, Dylan had come when I was 15, and obviously I listened to his music first, and his music contained a lot — I used to say when I heard 'Highway 61,' I was hearing the first true picture of how I felt and how my country felt. And that was exhilarating. Because I think 1960s small-town America was very Lynchian. Everything was there, but underneath, everything was rumbling. ... I think what Dylan did, was he took all that dark stuff that was rumbling underneath, and I think he pushed it to the surface with irony and humor, but also tremendous courage to go places where people hadn't gone previously. So when I heard that, I knew I liked that, and I was very ambitious, also.

On The Timing Of Darkness’ Release
"I think Darkness came out of a place where I was afraid of losing myself. I had the first taste of success [with Born to Run], so you realize it's possible for your talent to be co-opted and for your identity to be moved and shifted in ways that you may not have been prepared for. I was the only person I'd ever met who had a record contract. None of the E Street Band, as far as I know, had been on an airplane until Columbia sent us to Los Angeles. ... It was a smaller, smaller world. And we were provincial guys with no money. So there was this whole little street life in Asbury Park, and New York was a million miles away. Localism, as a movement, hadn't occurred yet in music. So there was nobody saying, 'I need to see what those bands in New Jersey are doing.' It was a very different time. But the good part about it was you were very, very connected to place and you had a real sense of place. And it was unique, the place where you lived and where you grew up."

On Where The Tracks On Darkness Originated
"No one knows anyone else who has any money. They only know you. And at the time, even though we're making a lot of records, we're not making much money, because we didn't know how to make records, or because I signed a lot of bad deals and it all went away. My desire to not get disconnected from my parents and their history and a lot of the people I cared about; I said, 'These things aren't being written about that much. I'm not sure. And those were the topics I decided to take on for that particular record, not so much out of any social consciousness, but as a way of survival of my own inner life and soul."

On Musical Influences
"I don't know if I know anyone, with the exception of the early inventors of rock music [who wasn't influenced by something]. And even then, the kind of study that had to go on — like the gospel background in Jerry Lee Lewis' piano playing, and it's completely informed with church and honky-tonk — and you have to study that stuff. I don't mean study in the sense of literal schooling, but you're drawn to things that make you seek out what they're about. That's studying. And whether you're drawn to gospel music or church music or honky-tonk music, it informs your character and it informs your talent."

On Great New Music
"If you're good, you're always looking over your shoulder. I mean, that's the life — that's the gun-slinging life. It's like, 'Yes, you are very fast, my friend, but there's some kid in his garage tonight, and just about 10 minutes from now...' You can't make any mistake about it. The record and documentary show that [that album] was carved meticulously and consciously out of a big chunk of stone over a long period of time, with a huge amount of ego and ambition and hunger, hopefully for the right things."

Thompson on Hollywood


[Photo courtesy of LAT, "A young Bruce Springsteen is seen and heard on The Promise: The Darkness On The Edge Of Town Story"]

This article is related to: Genres, Reviews, Celebs, Musical, Documentaries


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.