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WATCH: Matthew McConaughey Explains the Real Origins of "All right, all right, all right"

Photo of Beth Hanna By Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood March 13, 2014 at 11:38AM

Most people familiar with Richard Linklater's "Dazed and Confused" know that Matthew McConaughey's character in the film, David Wooderson, says the now famous McConaughey-ism "all right, all right, all right" (which became the actor's mantra throughout this past awards season, right up to the Oscar podium). But how did McConaughey come up with the idea to incorporate that into his first big-screen role? Watch below.
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Matthew McConaughey accepting his award at the 2014 Oscars
Matthew McConaughey accepting his award at the 2014 Oscars

Most people familiar with Richard Linklater's "Dazed and Confused" know that Matthew McConaughey's character in the film, David Wooderson, says the now famous McConaughey-ism "all right, all right, all right" (which became the actor's mantra throughout this past awards season, right up to the Oscar podium). But how did McConaughey come up with the idea to incorporate that into his first big-screen role? Watch below.

Complex has dug up a 2011 interview between George Stroumboulopoulos and McConaughey, wherein the actor explains he'd been listening to a live recording by the Doors as prep before shooting his scenes in "Dazed and Confused." Jim Morrison yells "all right" four times at the start of a song. And so the catch phrase was born.

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This article is related to: Video, Video, Matthew McConaughey


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.