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Media Watch: Chelsea Clinton is NBC's Latest Anchor, YouTube's First Entertainment Channel, Newsweek Cuts

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood November 14, 2011 at 8:15PM

NBC announced on Monday that Chelsea Clinton will be a full-time special correspondent for its Nightly News program. Clinton will host a series called "Making a Difference," which focuses on people who volunteer in their communities to improve the lives of those around them. Clinton told him "That’s the kind of thing, if this were to happen, that I would really like to do," Steve Capus, the president of NBC, told the NYT. “It’s not about Chelsea Clinton saying, ‘Here I am; I want to be a TV star.’”
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Newsweek/Daily Beasts Tina Brown
Newsweek/Daily Beasts Tina Brown

NBC announced on Monday that Chelsea Clinton will be a full-time special correspondent for its Nightly News program. Clinton will host a series called "Making a Difference," which focuses on people who volunteer in their communities to improve the lives of those around them. Clinton told him "That’s the kind of thing, if this were to happen, that I would really like to do," Steve Capus, the president of NBC, told the NYT. “It’s not about Chelsea Clinton saying, ‘Here I am; I want to be a TV star.’”

-Newsweek, buried in debt, can't afford its longtime political series, "the project," in which a gaggle of reporters follow presidential candidates, detailing every aspect of the campaign before Election Day. Newsweek editrix Tina Brown has cancelled this venture after almost thirty years, looking for a way to both cut the budget and demonstrate a fresh identity, reports NYT's MediaDecoder.

-YouTube has launched its first original programming with Clevver Media's ClevverTeVe, a Spanish-language news and entertainment program. This marks the first of almost 100 premium channels that YouTube has planned, including shows from Madonna, Jay-Z, Tony Hawk, and Ashton Kutcher, with an investment of nearly $100 million.

-Warner Brothers and ABC just signed a deal that will allow viewers to access episodes of scripted, primetime shows 24-hours after their launch. Viewers can view these shows through network-branded websites, like Hulu and VOD, reports Variety. The deal will also extend to allow Warner Brothers to take shows into off-network syndication in order to sell them to VOD programs like Netflix one year earlier than the usual four years after the season's completion.

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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.