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Music Box Will Release Sundance HBO Doc 'Marina Abramovic The Artist is Present'

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood March 16, 2012 at 3:44PM

The rule changes for documentaries to qualify for next year's Academy Awards require a multi-city theatrical run and a review in The NY Times. In an interview, HBO Documentary Films czar Sheila Nevins told me that going forward, HBO will now choose a far smaller number of films to qualify for the Oscars. Well, now HBO has picked one.
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Marina Abramovic
Marina Abramovic

The rule changes for documentaries to qualify for next year's Academy Awards require a multi-city theatrical run and a review in The NY Times. In an interview, HBO Documentary Films czar Sheila Nevins told me that going forward, HBO will now choose a far smaller number of films to qualify for the Oscars. (The rest will head for Emmy contention.) Well, now HBO has picked one. They will partner with Submarine Entertainment and Music Box Films to open Matthew Akers' 'Marina Abramovic The Artist is Present' theatrically to qualify the movie for Oscar consideration, shortly before its June premiere on HBO.

Music Box is partnering with Josh Braun's Submarine Entertainment for the film's domestic distribution.  The film is a Show of Force Production in association with HBO Documentary Films.
 
Outrageous performance artist Abramović has been doing her thing for almost 40 years, using and testing her body --and its limits. With total access granted by Abramović and New York's Museum of Modern Art, Akers ("Carrier," "Circus") takes the viewer inside her world: professional (curators, collaborators, fans) and personal ( lovers, friends). We also sit across from the artist during her recent well-attended MoMA show.

View the film's trailer here and below.
 
 

This article is related to: News, Sundance 2012 Films, Sundance 2012, Sundance 2012 News, Sundance


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.