Now and Then: 'Brazil,' Terry Gilliam's Dystopia — And Ours, Too

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by Matt Brennan
December 18, 2012 4:20 PM
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Terry Gilliam's "Brazil," from 1985
To my discredit, I had never seen "Brazil." It sat atop my pile of screeners for a few weeks, its length and reputation forbidding. Like all dystopian fictions, Terry Gilliam's 1985 epic is a prophecy of sorts, guesswork for a grim future. And it turned out he was right.

When I sat down to watch it Thursday night, cheap memo pad in hand, it seemed a gonzo, steampunk satire, a vision of Western bureaucracies and men in gray flannel suits indebted to Orwell's "1984," Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange," and Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner," and I suppose it is, or was. But it would be disingenuous, now, to read it only as such, to ignore its bleaker implications in the face of the world beyond the frame. I suspect the comic, capering elements of "Brazil" once made sense on their own terms — perhaps because Gilliam, with co-writers Charles McKeown and Tom Stoppard, had no way of knowing just how eerily accurate their more shadowy predictions would be.

The film opens on an upbeat note, the bright theme ("Aquarela do Brasil") shimmering through the clouds, descending Earthward. A store window's televisions screens blare out a good-natured advertisement for more screens, and then a bomb goes off, shattering the glass in a thousand splinters, mere memories of an image. An anti-government bombing campaign, we quickly learn, has raged for 13 years.

The question of violence, playing out not only at the movies but on all of the other screens that make up our 21st-century existence, is once again rumbling beneath our collective grief. The New Yorker's David Denby, for one, asked it after this summer's shooting in Aurora, Colorado, and reminded his readers that the debate reaches back to the days of Penn and Peckinpah, if not before. MSNBC's Joe Scarborough, in an affecting repudiation of his former relationship with the National Rifle Association, expressed disgust at first-person shooter video games and the movies' brutal bloodshed. We are faced once again, as we have been so many times this year already, with the dense thicket of influences on a horrific pattern in American life.   
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