Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Obit: Karl Malden Dead at 97

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood July 1, 2009 at 1:45AM

Karl Malden is dead.The theater actor will probably best be remembered for reprising his stage role as Mitch in Elia Kazan's Streetcar Named Desire, for which he won the supporting actor Oscar. He also made his mark in Kazan's On the Waterfront. While Malden played his share of villains, he was known for his decency, finally. He represented something good in all of us. In 1962, John Frankenheimer starred him in both The Birdman of Alcatraz and All Fall Down. Walden stood up to Rosalind Russell in Gypsy and played Bradley to George C. Scott's Patton.
1


Karl Malden is dead.The theater actor will probably best be remembered for reprising his stage role as Mitch in Elia Kazan's Streetcar Named Desire, for which he won the supporting actor Oscar. He also made his mark in Kazan's On the Waterfront. While Malden played his share of villains, he was known for his decency, finally. He represented something good in all of us. In 1962, John Frankenheimer starred him in both The Birdman of Alcatraz and All Fall Down. Walden stood up to Rosalind Russell in Gypsy and played Bradley to George C. Scott's Patton.

Later in life, he starred opposite Michael Douglas in the popular TV series The Streets of San Francisco. He served for a time as president of the Academy, and a pitchman for American Express: "Don't Leave home without it." We should all wish to generate such respect and affection, and live so long.

UPDATE: In Contention collects some Malden obits.

originally posted on Variety.com

This article is related to: Obit


E-Mail Updates








Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.